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<strong>Fig. 99:4.</strong> The front part of a tick (<i>Ixodes hexagonus</i>). <p>
I. hexagonus 
<p><strong>Fig. 45:3.</strong> Tick (<i>Ixodes</i> sp.).</p>
Ixodes sp. 
<strong>Fig. 113:1.</strong> Macro photography of a tick (<i>Ixodes</i> sp.). Camera: Nikon CoolPix 4500.
<p>
B. burgdorferi 
<p><strong>Fig. 99:3.</strong> Macro photography of a tick på (<i>Ixodes ricinus</i>) to the left and a seed of the castor bean (<i>Ricinus communis</i>) to the right. The tick is an adult female, which recently finished a blood meal on a cat. Camera: Nikon CoolPix 4500.</p>

<p> </p>
I. ricinus 
<p><strong>Fig. 17:6.</strong> <em>Streptococcus dysgalactiae</em> subsp. <em>dysgalactiae</em>, cultivated on a SELMA Plus plate at 37°C during 24 h. Note that S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae is only growing in sector a (bovine blood agar with aesculin) and that the greenish α-hemolysis can be seen. Date: 2014-11-13.</p>

<p> </p>
S. dysgal. dysgal. 
<strong>Fig. 17:4.</strong> A. Colonies of <i>Streptococcus dysgalactiae</i> subsp. <i>dysgalactiae</i> cultivated on purple agar at 37 °C during 24 h. The plate shows that this bacterium is a lactose fermenter. B. Close-up of some colonies from the agar plate to the left. The total length of the scale bars is equivalent to 1 cm and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2014-11-16.</p>
S. dysgal. dysgal. 
<b>Fig. 68:7.</b> Cultivation (aerobic) of <i>Escherichia coli</i> (strain ATCC 35218) on MSRV agar at 41.5°C during 24 h. Note the very weak growth at the three application sites (denoted with arrows) and that <i>E. coli</i> is not swarming from these sites. Compare how <i>Salmonella</i> spp. is growing on MSRV agar. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 mm.
<p>
E. coli 
<p><strong>Fig. 72:3.</strong> Streak of <i>Proteus mirabilis</i> on purple agar (A) and MacConkey agar (B). Note that <i>Proteus</i> spp. swarm on purple agar, but not on MacConkey agar. The length of the scalebars is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2016-10-19.</p>

<p> </p>
P. mirabilis 
<strong>Fig. 85:5.</strong> Colonies of <i>Listonella anguillarum</i> cultivated on purple agar at 30°C. A. Cultivation during 24 h; B. Cultivation during 48 h. <i>L. anguillarum</i> is growing well on purple agar, but doesn't ferment lactose (no colour change in the plate). The total length of the respective scale bars is equivalent to 1 cm. <p>
L. anguillarum 
<p><strong>Fig. 109:3.</strong> Colonies of <i>Campylobacter coli</i>, strain SLV427, cultivated microaerophilically on a CCDA plate at 37°C during 48 h. A, overview of the plate; B, close-up. The lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to 10 and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-05-26.</p>

<p> </p>
C. coli 
<b>Fig. 68:8.</b> Colonies of <i>Escherichia coli</i>, strain VB 008/14, cultivated aerobically on CLED agar at 37°C during 24 h. A, overview; B, close-up (photo montage). From the overview, it is evident that the indicator has changed colour around the colonies, which thus ferment lactose. The lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to 10 and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2014-01-22.
<p>
E. coli 
<p><b>Fig 69:7.</b> Colonies of <i>Klebsiella pneumoniae</i> subsp. <i>pneumonia</i>, strain CCUG 225<sup>T</sup>, cultivated aerobically on a <a href="/index.php?displayextinfo=43" target="_blank">SELMA plate</a>. The SELMA-plate contains bovine blood agar with aesculine (Sector 1), Mac Conkey agar (Sector 2) and mannitol salt agar (Sector 3). <i>Klebsiella</i> spp. does grow in all sectors except on mannitol salt agar. The SELMA plate was photographed with a dark background and with lighting from above. Date: 2012-06-16 and revised 2017-06-08.</p>

<p> </p>
K. pneum. pneum. 
<b>Fig. 135:5.</b> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus pseudintermedius</i>, strain SVA-MRSP 134, cultivated on purple agar with lactose at 37°C during 24 h. A, The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. B, A partial close-up of A, which is photographed from another angle. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Note that <i>S. pseudintermedius</i> is a lactose fermenter.<p>
S. pseudintermedius 
<b>Fig. 70:10.</b> Cultivation (aerobic) of A, <i>Salmonella enterica</i> subsp. <i>enterica</i>, serovar Diarizonae (strain ???) on <a href="/vetbact/popup/popup.php?id=51" target="_blank">MSRV agar</a> at 41.5°C during 4 days. Compare Fig. 70:6 and 70:7 and note the difference in appearance.  The application sites  are denoted with arrows. 
<p>
S. ent. enterica 
<p><b>Fig. 70:8.</b> Cultivation (aerobic) of A, <i>Salmonella enterica</i> subsp. <i>enterica</i>, serovar Typhimurium (strain CCUG 31969) and B, <i>Citrobacter freundii</i> (strain VB 007/11) on <a href="/vetbact/popup/popup.php?id=51" target="_blank">MSRV agar</a> at 41.5°C during 24 h. Note the heavy growth at the three application sites on plate A and that this serovar of salmonella is swarming all over the plate within 24 h. Compare Fig. 70:2. Neither growth nor swarming can be observed on plate B around the application sites (denoted with arrows). The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 mm.</p>
S. ent. enterica 
<p><strong>Fig. 107:4.</strong> Colonies of <i>Actinobacillus equuli</i> subsp. <i>equuli</i>, strain CCUG 2041, cultivated on purple agar at 37°C during 24 h. Note that the colour change around the colonies of <i>A. equuli</i> subsp. <i>equuli </i>shows that lactose is fermented during acid production. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 mm. Date: 2016-10-06.</p><p> </p>
A. eq. equuli 
<p><strong>Fig. 86:4.</strong> Colonies of <i>Aeromonas hydrophila</i> subsp. <i>hydrophila</i> cultivated on purple agar during 24 h at 37°C. The image shows that this bacterium grows well on purple agar, but it does not ferment lactose (no colour change on the plate. The total length of the scalebar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2016-10-11.</p>

<p> </p>
A. hydr. hydrophila 
<strong>Fig. 124:3.</strong> Colonies of <i>Enterococcus faecalis</i>, strain CCUG 9997, cultivated on purple agar at 37°C during 24 h. Note that the colour change around the colonies shows that lactose is fermented during acid production. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 mm. Date: 2016-10-17.</p>
E. faecalis 
<strong>Fig. 190:4.</strong> Colonies of <i>Enterococcus faecium</i>, VRE strain, cultivated on purple agar at 37°C during 24 h. Note that the colour change around the colonies shows that lactose is fermented during acid production. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 mm. Date: 2016-10-18.</p>
E. faecium 
<p><strong>Fig. 77:3.</strong> Colonies of <i>Yersinia enterocolitica</i> subsp. <i>enterocolitica</i>, strain 45643, cultivated on <a href="http://www.vetbact.org/?displayextinfo=107" target="_blank"><b>CIN-agar</b></a> during 24 h at 30°C. Image B is a close-up of image A. Note the appearance of the colonies (so-called "bull&#39;s eye") on CIN agar. The lengths of the scale bars corresponds to 1 cm and 3 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-10-25.</p>

<p> </p>
Y. enter. enterocol. 
<p><strong>Fig. 71:4.</strong> Colonies of <i>Plesiomonas shigelloides</i> cultivated on purple agar at 37 °C during 24 h. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2016-11-02.</p>

<p> </p>
P. shigelloides 
<strong>Fig. 87:4.</strong> Colonies of <i>Aeromonas salmonicida</i> subsp. <i>salmonicida</i> cultivated on purple agar at ambient temperature during 48 h. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2016-11-02.</p>
A. salm. salmonicida 
Colonies of <i>Melissococcus plutonius</i>, strain LMG 20360, cultivated under anaerobic conditions on basal medium agar during 6 days at 35°C. <p>
M. plutonius 
<p><strong>Fig. 190:5.</strong>Colonies of <i>Enterococcus faecium</i>, strain VRE 300/04, cultivated aerobically during 48 h on SlaBa agar with vancomycin at 37°C.</p>

<p> </p>
E. faecium 
<strong>Fig. 190:6.</strong> Close up of colonies of <i>Enterococcus faecium</i>, strain VRE 300/04, cultivated aerobically during 48 h on SlaBa agar with vancomycin at 37°C. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 3 mm. Slanetz-Bartley agar contains, among other things, tetrazolium chloride, which is reduced to insoluble formazon (cerise red colour) by enterococci. Note also the precipitation zone around the colonies. <p>
E. faecium 
<p><b>Fig. 70:9.</b> Cultivation (aerobic) of A, <i>Salmonella enterica</i> subsp. <i>enterica</i>, serovar Dublin (strain CCUG 35631) and B, <i>Escherichia coli</i> (strain ATCC 35218) on <a href="/vetbact/popup/popup.php?id=51" target="_blank">MSRV agar</a> at 41.5°C during 24 h. Note the heavy growth at the three application sites on plate A and that <i>Salmonella</i> spp. is swarming from these sites. Compare Fig. 70:3. Only weak growth and swarming can be observed on plate B around the application sites (denoted with arrows). The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 mm.</p>

<p> </p>
S. ent. enterica 
<b>Fig. 20:7.</b> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, strain SLV 350, cultivated aerobically on purple agar with lactose during 24 h at 37°C. The lighting was from above. Note that <i>S. aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i> is a lactose fermenter. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-02-05.<p>
S. au. aureus 
<p><b>Fig. 60:10.</b> Colonies of <i>Mannheimia haemolytica</i>, strain ..., after cultivation on purple agar (with lactose) during 48 h at 37°C. Note that this strain of <i>M. haemolytica</i> does not ferment lactose. <strong><i>M. haemolytica</i> is lactose variable.</strong> The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-03-04.</p>

<p> </p>
M. haemolytica 
<b>Fig. 69:5</b>. Colonies of <i>Klebsiella pneumoniae</i>  subsp. <i>pneumoniae</i>, strain CCUG 225<sup>T</sup>, cultivated aerobically on purple agar (with lactose) during 24 h at 37°C. Note the mucoid appearence of the streak where individual colonies cannot be observed and that <i>K. pneumoniae</i> ferments lactose. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-06-15. <p>
K. pne. pneumoniae 
<b>Fig. 69:6</b>. Colonies of <i>Klebsiella pneumoniae</i>  subsp. <i>pneumoniae</i>, strain CCUG 225<sup>T</sup>, cultivated aerobically on CLED agar during 24 h at 37°C. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-10-18. <p>
K. pneu. pneu. 
<b>Fig. 70:6.</b> Colonies of <i>Salmonella enterica</i> subsp. <i>enterica</i>, isolate LL 681, cultivated aerobically on XLD agar at 37°C during 24 h. Note the black colour of the colonies. A, overview image, where the length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. B, close-up of the colonies, which shows that the edge of the colony is not black. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. <p>
S. ent. enterica 
<b>Fig. 70:5.</b> Colonies of <i>Salmonella enterica</i> subsp. <i>enterica</i>, isolate LL 681, cultivated aerobically on BG agar at 37°C during 24 h. Note that there is no yellow colour around the colonies since salmonellas are lactose negative. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. <p>
S. ent. enterica 
<b>Fig. 68:6.</b> Colonies of <i>Escherichia coli</i>, strain SLV 082, cultivated aerobically on BG agar at 37°C during 24 h. Note that the yellow colour around the colonies since <i>E. coli</i> is lactose positive. <i>E. coli</i> does not grow well on BG-agar (cf. Fig. 70:3). The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2012-01-19.
<p>
E. coli 
<strong>Fig. 70:7.</strong> Colonies of <i>Salmonella enterica</i> subsp. <i>enterica</i>, serovar Diarizonae, cultivated aerobically on BG agar (A) and XLD+N-agar (B) at 37°C during 24 h. Note that there is no yellow colour around the colonies (in A) since salmonellas are lactose negative and black colonies (in B). The length of the scale bars is equivalent to 1 cm.
</p>
S. ent. enterica 
<strong>Fig. 53:5.</strong> Colonies of <i>Bordetella bronchiseptica</i>, strain ..., cultivated aerobically on Smith-Baskerville medium at 37°C during about 70 h. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm.

</p>
B. bronchiseptica 
<b>Fig 69:8.</b> Colonies of <i>Klebsiella pneumoniae</i> subsp. <i>pneumoniae</i>, strain CCUG 225<sup>T</sup>, cultivated aerobically on a <a href="/index.php?displayextinfo=114" target="_blank">SELMA Plus plate</a>. The SELMA Plus plate contains bovine blood agar with aesculine (Sector 1), Mac Conkey agar Sector 2), PGUA agar for differentiation of <i>E. coli</i> and <i>Klebsiella</i> spp. (Sector 3) and mannitol salt agar (Sector 4).  <i>Klebsiella</i> spp. does grow in all sectors except on mannitol salt agar and note that no colour change has occured in the PGUA agar, which it would have done if <i>E. coli</i> is growing on this medium. The SELMA PLUS plates were photographed against a dark background and with lighting from above (A) and against a  light background and lighting from below (B). The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm.Date: 2017-06-07. <p>
K. pneum . pneum. 
<p><strong>Fig. 68:12.</strong> <i>Escherichia coli</i>, strain SLV 082, cultivated on <a href="/vetbact/index.php?displayextinfo=88" target="_blank">UriCult</a> at 37°C during 24 h. <i>E. coli</i>-strains grow on CLED agar (A side) and the colour of the medium is changed from green to yellow since <i>E. coli</i> ferments lactose. Most pathogens of the urinary tract grow on MacConkey-agar (the upper part of the B side). Most <i>E. coli</i> strains form black colonies on <i>E. coli</i> agar (the lower part of the B side).</p>

<p> </p>
E. coli 
<strong>Fig. 73:4.</strong> Cultivation of <i>Proteus vulgaris</i>, strain SLV 476, on a CLED agar plate for 24 h at 37°C. Note that <i>P. vulgaris</i> is not swarming on CLED agar. The lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to 10 mm in the left panel and 5 mm in the right panel. Date: 2013-12-26.
<p>
P. vulgaris 
<strong>Fig. 73:5.</strong> Cultivation of <i>Proteus vulgaris</i>, strain SLV 476, on a blood MacConkey agar for 24 h at 37°C. Note that <i>P. vulgaris</i> is not swarming on MacConkey agar without NaCl. The lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to 10 mm in the left panel and 5 mm in the right panel. Date: 2013-12-26.
<p>
P. vulgaris 
<p><b>Fig. 68:5.</b> Colonies of <i>Escherichia coli</i>, strain SLV 082, cultivated on purple agar at 37°C during 24 h. Note the pH shift on the agar plate around colonies. Thus, <i>E. coli</i> is a lactose fermenter. Date: 2014-09-17.<p>
E. coli 
<p><strong>Fig. 19:7.</strong> <em>Streptococcus uberis</em> cultivated on a SELMAPLUS plate at 37°C during 24 h. Note that <em>S. uberis</em> is only growing in sector 1 (blood agar with esculine) and that this strain has a greenish α-hemolysis. However, the hemolysis is not visible on this plate, which was only photographed with lighting from above. See instead Fig. 19:6. The cultivation media in the other sectors are given in the media list under SELMA Plus plate. Date: 2017-06-07.</p>

<p> </p>
S. uberis 
<strong>Fig. 14:4.</strong> A. Colonies of <i>Streptococcus equi</i> subsp. <i>equi</i> cultivated on purple agar at 37 °C during 24 h. The plate shows that this bacterium is not a lactose fermenter and that this bacterium grows poorly on purple agar. B. Close-up of some colonies from the agar plate to the left. The total length of the scale bars is equivalent to 1 cm and 2 mm, respectively. Date: 2014-11-19.</p>
S. equi equi 
<p><strong>Fig. 19:5.</strong> A. Colonies of <i>Streptococcus uberis</i> cultivated on purple agar at 37 °C during 24 h. The plate shows that this bacterium is a lactose fermenter. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2019-11-16.</p>
S. uberis 
<strong>Fig. 15:6.</strong> A. Colonies of <i>Streptococcus equi</i> subsp. <i>zooepidemicus</i> cultivated on purple agar at 37 °C during 24 h. The plate shows that this bacterium is a lactose fermenter. The total length of the scale bars is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2014-11-24.</p>
S. equi zooep. 
<strong>Fig. 121:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Streptococcus dysgalactiae</i> subsp. <i>equisimilis</i>, strain CCUG 36637, cultivated aerobically on purple agar during 24 h at 37°C. <i>S. dysgalactiae</i> subsp. <i>equisimilis</i> grows very poorly on purple agar and it is only possible to see some faint colonies on the upper part of the agar plate. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 mm. Date: 2015-09-02. </p>
S dysgal. equisim. 
<p><b>Fig. 68:9. </b>Colonies of <i>Escherichia coli</i>, cultivated aerobically on Chromogenic E. coli/coliform selective agar during 24 h at 30°C. This is a medium, which is used for enumeration of coliform bacteria. The medium contains Rose-Gal and X-Glu, which can be used to detect β-galactosidase and β-glucoronidase, respectively. <i>E. coli</i> has both enzymes and gives purple colonies, whereas other coliforms only possess β-galactosidase and, thus, give pink colonies. Other bacteria give coulorless colonies or blue colonies if they have β-glucoronidase. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 mm. Date: 2010-06-17.</p>

<p> </p>
E. coli 
<b>Fig. 68:10.</b> Closeup of colonies of <i>Escherichia coli</i>, cultivated aerobically on Chromogenic E. coli/coliform selective agar during 24 h at 30°C. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. For more information see Fig. 68:2. Date: 2010-06-17. <p>
E. coli 

C. lari 
<b>Fig. 68:11</b>  Colonies of coliform bacteria cultivated on a <a href="http://www.vetbact.org/vetbact/?displayextinfo=101" target="_blank"><b>VRB agar plate</b></a>. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date 2017-05-03. </p>
E. coli 
<p><b>Fig. 29:4.</b> Colonies of <i>Clostridium perfringens</i> cultivated on <a href="http://www.vetbact.org/vetbact/?displayextinfo=98" target="_blank"><b><b>TSC-agar</b></b></a> without lecithin (A) and with lecithin (B). Note the precipitation zone around the colonies in plate B. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2017-05-10.</p>

<p> </p>
C. perfringens 
<b>Fig. 19:5.</b> <i>Streptococcus uberis</i> cultivated on a SELMA plate at 37°C during 24 h. Note that <i>S. uberis</i> is only growing in sector 1 (blood agar with esculine). Image A was photographed with lighting from above and image B with lighting from below. The hemolysis is most clearly visible in image B. The cultivation media in the other sectors are given in the media list under <a href="/index.php?displayextinfo=43" target="_blank">SELMA plate</a>. <i>S. uberis</i> has only a weak esculinase activity and it is, therefore, difficult to see that it is actually esculinase positive. Date: 2017-06-07.</p>
S. uberis 
<b>Fig. 20:9.</b> <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, cultivated on a SELMA plate at 37°C during 24 h. Note that <i>S. aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i> is growing in sector 1 (blood agar with esculine) and in sector 3 (mannitol salt agar). Image A was photographed with lighting from above and image B with lighting from below. The hemolysis is most clearly visible in image B, where you can also discern the double hemolysis. The cultivation media in all sectors are given in the media list under <a href="/index.php?displayextinfo=43" target="_blank">SELMA plate</a>. Date: 2017-06-14.</p>
S. aureus aureus 
<p><strong>Fig. 20:10.</strong> <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, strain yyy, cultivated on a SELMAPLUS plate at 37°C during 24 h. Note that <i>S. aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i> is growing in sector 1 (blood agar with esculine) and sector 4 (mannitol salt agar). Image A was photographed with lighting from above and image B with lighting from below. The hemolysis is most clearly visible in image B, but the double hemolysis is difficult to see (see instead Fig. 20:9. The cultivation media in the other sectors are given in the media list under <a href="/index.php?displayextinfo=114" target="_blank">SELMA Plus plate</a>. Date: 2017-06-14.</p>

<p> </p>
S. aureus aureus 
<p><strong>Fig. 68:13.</strong> <i>Escherichia coli</i> cultivated on a SELMAPLUS plate at 37°C during 24 h. Note that <i>E. coli</i> is growing in sector 1 (blood agar with esculine), sector 2 (MacConkey agar) and sector 3 (PGUA agar). Image A was photographed with lighting from above and image B with lighting from below. Note that a colour change has occured in the PGUA agar, which would not have occured if <i>Klebsiella</i> spp. had been cultivated on this medium. This strain of <i>E. coli</i> does not give hemolysis. The cultivation media in the other sectors are given in the media list under <a href="/index.php?displayextinfo=114" target="_blank">SELMA Plus plate</a>. Date: 2017-06-14.</p>

<p> </p>
E. coli 
<p><strong>Fig. 13:4.</strong> Colonies of <i>Listeria monocytogenes</i>, strain ... ... ..., cultivated during 48 h at 37°C on <a href="http://www.vetbact.org/vetbact/?displayextinfo=112" target="_blank">Brillians-Listeria-agarmedium</a>. Note the blue-greenish colour of the colonies and the turbid zone around the colonies. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2017-02-04.</p>

<p> </p>
L. monocytogenes 
<p><strong>Fig. 89:4.</strong> Colonies of<em> Campylobacter jejuni</em> subsp. <em>jejuni</em> cultivated under microaerophilic conditions on modified CCD agar agar during 2 days at 41.5°C. Image A shows the whole plate and image B is a partial close-up of some colonies with typical irregular edge and metallic sheen. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 and 1 cm, respectively. Date: 2017-09-11.</p>

<p> </p>
C. jejuni jejuni 
<strong>Fig. 124:4.</strong> Colonies of <i>Enterococcus faecalis</i>, strain ... ... ..., cultivated during 24 h at 44°C on <a href="http://www.vetbact.org/vetbact/?displayextinfo=95" target="_blank">SlaBa-agar medium</a>. Note the red colour of the colonies. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2017-03-31<p>
E. faecalis 
<strong>Fig. 153:6.</strong> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus pseudintermedius</i>, strain ... ... ..., cultivated during 24 h at 37°C on <a href="http://www.vetbact.org/vetbact/?displayextinfo=50" target="_blank">CLED-agar</a>. Note the colour change of the agar in the vicinity of the colonies. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2017-03-31.<p>
S. pseudintermedius 
<p><strong>Fig. 21:6.</strong> Five suspected colonies of <em>Bacillus cereus</em> has here been further cultivated on <a href="http://www.vetbact.org/vetbact/?displayextinfo=103" target="_blank"><b>MYP-agar</b></a>. Note the precipitation around the streaks and no colour change in the agar. The plate was photgraphed against a black background. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2017-05-03.</p>

<p> </p>
B. cereus 
<p><b>Fig. 20:8.</b> Colonies of <i>Stapylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i> cultivated on <a href="http://www.vetbact.org/vetbact/?displayextinfo=96" target="_blank"><b>Baird-Parker agar</b></a>. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2017-05-03.</p>

<p> </p>
S. aureus aureus 
<strong>Fig. 17:5.</strong> <i>Streptococcus dysgalactiae</i> subsp. <i>dysgalactiae</i>, cultivated on a <a href="/index.php?displayextinfo=43" target="_blank">SELMA plate</a> at 37°C during 24 h. Plate A is photographed with lighting from above and plate B with lighting from below. Note that <i>S. dysgalactiae</i> subsp. <i>dysgalactiae</i> is only growing in sector 1 (bovine blood agar with aesculin) and that the greenish α-hemolysis can be seen in plate B, although it is weak. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2017-09-06.</p>
S. dysgal. dysgal. 
<strong>Fig. 16:10.</strong> <i>Streptococcus agalactiae</i>, cultivated on a <a href="/index.php?displayextinfo=43" target="_blank">SELMA plate</a> at 37°C during 24 h. Plate A was photographed with lighting from above and plate B with lighting from below. Note that <i>S. agalactiae</i> is only growing in sector 1 (bovine blood agar with aesculin) and that the clear β-hemolysis can easily be seen in plate B. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2017-09-20.</p>
S. agalactiae 
<p><strong>Fig. 16:11.</strong> <em>Streptococcus agalactiae</em>, cultivated on a SELMA Plus plate at 37°C during 24 h. Plate A was photographed with lighting from above and plate B with lighting from below. Note that <em>S. agalactiae</em> is only growing in sector 1 (bovine blood agar with aesculin) and that the clear β-hemolysis is clearly visible in plate B. Date: 2017-09-20.</p>

<p> </p>
S. agalactiae 
<b>Fig. 16:9.</b> Colonies of <i>Streptococcus agalactiae</i>, strain 09mas018883, cultivated on purple agar (with lactose) at 37°C during 24 h. The colonies are rather small on purple agar, but it is evident that this bacterium ferments lactose. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-04-06. <p>
S. agalactiae 
<strong>Fig. 258:1.</strong> <i>Streptococcus saprophyticus</i> subsp. <i>saprophyticus</i>, cultivated on a <a href="/index.php?displayextinfo=114" target="_blank">SELMA Plus plate</a> at 37°C during 24 h. Plate A was photographed with lighting from above and plate B with lighting from below. Note that <i>S. saprophyticus</i> subsp. <i>saprophyticus</i> is growing in sector 1 (bovine blood agar with aesculin) and in sector 4 (mannitol salt agar) and that this staphylococcus does not produce hemolysis on blood agar. The length of the scalebar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2017-09-21.</p>
S. sapro. sapro. 
<b>Fig 1:4.</b> <i>Trueperella pyogenes</i> cultivated aerobically on a <a href="/index.php?displayextinfo=43" target="_blank">SELMA plate</a> at 37°C during 24 h in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The SELMA plate contains bovine blood agar with aesculine (Sector 1), Mac Conkey agar (Sector 2) and mannitol salt agar (Sector 3). <i>T. pyogenes</i> does grow only on blood agar. The SELMA plate was photographed with a dark background and with lighting from above. Date: 2017-09-27. </p>
T. pyogenes 
<p><b>Fig 1:5.</b> <i>Trueperella pyogenes</i> cultivated aerobically on a <a href="/index.php?displayextinfo=43" target="_blank">SELMA plate</a> at 37°C during A: 24 h and B: 48 h in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The plates were photographed with lighting from below to get the hemolysis, which is best observed in plate B, clearly visible.The SELMA plate contains bovine blood agar with aesculine (Sector 1), Mac Conkey agar (Sector 2) and mannitol salt agar (Sector 3). <i>T. pyogenes</i> does grow only on blood agar. Date: 2017-09-27.</p>

<p> </p>
T. pyogenes 
<p><strong>Fig. 89:2.</strong> Scanning electron micrograph of <i>Campylobacter jejuni</i> subsp. <i>jejuni</i>. Note the shape and the flagella.</p>

<p> </p>
C. je. jejuni 
<p><strong>Fig. 132:2.</strong> Scanning electron micrograph of <i>Brachyspira intermedia</i>, strain PWS/A<sup>T</sup>. Note the periplasmic flagella (= endoflagella or axial filament), which are visible where the outer membrane has been disrupted.</p>

<p> </p>
B. intermedia 
<strong>Fig. 134:3.</strong> Phase contrast micrograph of living <i>Treponema phagedenis</i>, strain V1. <p>
T. vaccae 
<strong>Fig. 131:2.</strong> Phase contrast microscopy of living <i>Brachyspira alvinipulli</i>, strain C1<sup>T</sup>. <p>
B. alvinipulli 
<p><strong>Fig. 131:3.</strong> Scanning electron micrograph of <i>Brachyspira alvinipulli</i>, stam C1<sup>T</sup>.</p>

<p> </p>
B. alvinipulli 
<p>Gram staining of <i>Vibrio vulnificus</i>. Note the apperance of the curved rods.</p>

<p> </p>
V. vulnificus 
<p><strong>Fig. 45:2.</strong> Giemsa staining for <i>Anaplasma phagocytophilum</i> in blood smear. Erythrocytes are surrounding a granulocyte with a nucleus. In the granulocyte, it is possible to see a morulae containing tightly packed anaplasmas as well as some free anaplasmas.</p>

<p> </p>
A. phagocyto. 
<p><strong>Fig. 45:1.</strong> Acridine orange staining for <i>Anaplasma phagocytophilum</i> of blood smear. Erythrocytes are surrounding granulocyte with a nucleus. In the granulocyte it is possible to see a morulae with tightly packed anaplasmas as well as some free anaplasmas.</p>

<p> </p>
A. phagocyto. 
<b>Fig. 98:3.</b> Phase contrast micrograph of living <i>Brachyspira pilosicoli</i>, strain P43/6/78<sup>T</sup>. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 µm. Cultures of <i>B. pilosicoli</i> often looks more messy than cultures of <i>B. hydysenteriae</i> (c.f. Fig. 97:3-4). Date: 2010-06-23. <p>
B. pilosicoli 
Scanning electron micrograph of <i>Melissococcus plutonius</i>. Intact bacteria are visible in the center of the image. Note that the bacteria excists as diplococci and it is possible to imagine where they are going to divide the next time. The total length of the scale bar corresponds to 1 µm. <p>
M. plutonius 
<p><strong>Fig. 179:1.</strong> Scanning electron micrograph of spores from <i>Paenibacillus larvae</i>, genotype ERIC I, strain 176-97. Three intact spores are visible in the center of the image. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 µm.</p>

<p> </p>
P. larvae 
<p><b>Fig. 11:2.</b> Capsule staining with methylene blue of <i>Bacillus anthracis</i> from <b>from the outbreak of anthrax in Halland (Sweden) in December, 2008</b>. The bacteria were first cultivated on blood agar and then in horse serum during 6 h.</p>

<p> </p>
B. anthracis 
<p><strong>Fig. 5:3.</strong> Scanning electron micrograph of <i>Mycobacterium avium</i> subsp. <i>paratuberculosis</i>. The image is published with permission from Johne´s Testing Center, University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA (http://www.johnes.org/).</p>

<p> </p>
M. avium paratb. 
<strong>Fig. 104:2.</strong> Methylene blue (MB) staining of <i>Dichelobacter nodosus</i>, strain .... Note the typical dark granulae, particularly close to the ends, which can be visualized by MB staining. <p>
D. nodosus 
<strong>Fig. 135:3.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Staphylococcus pseudintermedius</i>, strain VB 001/09.
<p>
S. pseudoint. 
<b>Fig. 97:4.</b> Phase contrast micrograph of living <i>Brachyspira hyodysenteriae</i>, strain B78<sup>T</sup> cells. The double arrow indicates the length of one cell. <p>
B. hyodysenteriae 
<p><strong>Fig. 97:3.</strong> Phase contrast micrograph of living <em>Brachyspira hyodysenteriae</em>, strain B78T cells. The lengths of the scale bars corresponds to 5 and 10 µm, respectively. A cell which is about 5 µm has probably undergone cell division recently, whereas a cell which is about 10 µm is probably soon going to divide. Datum: 2010-04-29.</p>

<p> </p>
B. hyodysenteriae 
<p><b>Fig. 116:1.</b> Dark field micrograph of <i>Leptospira borgpetersenii</i>, serogroup Sejroe, serovar Sejroe, strain M84. Note the unique morphology: very thin bacteria bacteria with a hook at one or both ends. The arrows indicate some bacteria where both hooks can be seen. Date: 2011-03-15.</p>

<p> </p>
L. borgpetersenii 
<p><b>Fig. 116:2.</b> Dark field photo micrograph of living <i>Leptospira borgpetersenii</i>, serogroup Ballum, serovar Ballum, strain M127. A and B show different magnification of the bacteria. At higher magnification (B) the arrow indicate a bacterium, where you can see the helical coiling pattern. This strain lacks the hooks (c.f. Fig. 116:1). Date: 2011-03-16.</p>

<p> </p>
L. borgpetersenii 
<p><b>Fig. 208:1.</b> Dark field photomicrograph of <i>Borrelia anserina</i>, strain FSD Pakistan. Image B and C show partial close-ups of the viewing field in image A, where the wave shape morphology can be observed (c.f. Fig 208:2-3). Date: 2011-04-26.</p>

<p> </p>
B. anserina 
<b>Fig. 208:2.</b> Phase contrast photomicrograph of <i>Borrelia anserina</i>, strain FSD Pakistan. Note the so-called planar flat wave morphology of the bacteria and that the bacteria at the arrows 1 and 2 has 7 and 8 nodes, respectively. Date: 2011-04-13. <p>
B. anserina 
<p><b>Fig. 208:3.</b> Phase contrast photomicrograph of <i>Borrelia anserina</i>, strain FSD Pakistan. A and B show the same bacterium, which in B has partly turned and, therefore, the area to the right of the arrow seems to be straight. In C the bacterium is going to divide at the point of the arrow. In D 6 or 7 waves are visible. Date: 2011-04-14.</p>

<p> </p>
B. anserina 
<p><b>Fig. 99:1.</b> Dark field photomicrograph of <i>Borrelia burgdorferi</i>, strain ACA-1. Note their so-called planar flat wave morphology. In the center of image E, a bacterium with only 3 waves can be observed and in the other images bacteria with up to 10 waves are visible. Date: 2011-04-19.</p>

<p> </p>
B. burgdorferi 
<p><b>Fig. 99:2.</b> Phase contrast photomicrograph of <i>Borrelia burgdorferi</i>, strain ACA-1. Image B-E show closeups of the bacteria. Note the wave shape of the bacteria. One of the bacteria in image D is turned 90° in relation to the other two bacteria, which makes it appear as almost straight. Image C and E show the same bacterium with different wave length. Date: 2011-04-25.</p>

<p> </p>
B. burgdorferi 
<p><strong>Fig. 24:3.</strong> Scanning electron micrograph of <i>Clostridium botulinum</i> type C/D, strain BKT015925. Note the flagella, which are clearly visible in both images. The lengths of the scale bars in A and B are equivalent to 4 µm and 0.4 µm, respectively. Date: 2013-02-13.</p>

<p> </p>
C. botulinum 
<p><strong>Fig. 11:3.</strong> Capsule staining with methylene blue of <em>Bacillus anthracis</em> in a blood smear. A "chain" of bacteria can be seen under the scalebars. The right image is a close-up of the left one. The lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to 10 µm i both images.</p>

<p> </p>
B. anthracis 
<p><strong>Fig. 187:1.</strong> Spores (blue arrows) and bipyramidal protein crystals (red arrows) of the Cry protein from <em>Bacillus thuringiensis</em>, serovar Kurstaki. This serovar can kill only leaf- and needle-feeding caterpillars. The length of the scale bar corresponds to 1 µm. Date: 2010-06-10.</p>

<p> </p>
B. thuringien. 
<p><strong>Fig. 11:4.</strong> Spores of <i>Bacillus anthracis.</i> This strain is of biotype Pasteur. Different strains of <i>B. anthracis</i> form spores, which can be of two morphological types, either almost sphaeric or more elongated. The depicted strain forms almost sphaeric spores (c.f. Fig. 11:5). The length of the scale bar corresponds to 1 µm.</p>

<p> </p>
B. anthracis 
<p><strong>Fig. 11:5.</strong> Spores of <i>Bacillus anthracis</i>. This strain is of biotype Sterne. Different strains of <i>B. anthracis</i> form spores, which can be of two morphological types, either almost sphaeric or more elongated. The depicted strain forms more elongated spores (c.f. Fig. 11:4).The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 µm. Date: 2010-06-15.</p>

<p> </p>
B. anthracis 
<p><strong>Fig. 21:3.</strong> Spores of <em>Bacillus cereus</em>, strain ATCC 14579T. This strain forms an exosporium (see Fig. 21:4), which is not as easily visible on the spores as on some other strains (c.f. Fig. 21:4). The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 2 µm. Date: 2010-06-16.</p>

<p> </p>
B. cereus 
<p><strong>Fig. 21:4.</strong> Spores of <em>Bacillus cereus</em>, strain NVH 0597-99. This strain produces an exosporium, which is clearly visible (see the arrow) and is smeared as a plastic bag around the spore (c.f. Fig. 3.). Spores of <em>B. anthracis</em> and <em>B. thuringiensis</em> are also surrounded by an exosporium, which thus, is another coat that overlies the normal spore coat. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 µm. Date: 2010-06-16.</p>

<p> </p>
B. cereus 
<p><strong>Fig. 133:2.</strong> Spores of <em>Bacillus atrophaeus</em>. This species forms spores, which can be distinguished from spores of <em>B. anthracis, B. cereus</em> and <em>B. thuringiensis </em>by the fact that they lack the exosporium as <em>B. subtilis</em> (c.f. Fig. 21:4). <em>B. atrophaeus </em>and <em>B. subtilis</em> are very closely related and have similar spores. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 2 µm. Date: 2010-06-16.</p>

<p> </p>
B. atrophaeus 
<p><strong>Fig. 57:4. </strong>Colonies of <i>Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae</i>, strain CCUG 12837, grown on an plate with horse blood and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i>, strain CCUG 4151, streaked in the form of a cross on a carpet of the target bacteria to establish the dependence of the V-factor ("satellitism"). The plate was incubated for 24 h at 37° C and photographed with lighting from below. Note the narrow zone of hemolysis around colonies that are visible under light from below. The "satellitism" is best viewed under light from above (see Fig. 57:3).</p>

<p> </p>
A. pleuropneu. 
<p><strong>Fig. 57:3. </strong>Colonies of <i>Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae</i>, strain CCUG 12,837, grown on an plate with horse blood and Staphylococcus aureus, strain CCUG 4151, streaked in the form of a cross on a carpet of the target bacteria to establish the dependence of the V-factor ("satellitism"). The plate was incubated for 24 h at 37°C and photographed with lighting from above. Note the "satellitism", which means that the best growth is obtained close to the streaks of <i>S. aureus</i>.</p>

<p> </p>

<p> </p>
A. pleuropneu. 
<b>Fig. 10:8.</b> CAMP test of <i>Rhodococcus equi</i> (vertikala stryk) with <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i> (horizontal streak) on bovine blood agar. Note the enhanced β-hemolysis at the arrows and that <i>R. equi</i> do not produce hemolysis hemolys in the absence of staphylococci. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-02-08.<p>
R. equi 
<b>Fig. 19:4.</b> CAMP test of <i>Streptococcus uberis</i>, strain VB 004/11 (the vertical streak A) with <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> (the horizontal streak). <i>Streptococcus agalactiae</i> (the vertical streak B) is used as positive control. Note that the β-hemolysis of <i>S. aureus</i> is not enhanced by <i>S. uberis</i> at the arrow as of the control. The lengt of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-04-06. <p>
S. uberis 
<b>Fig. 16:8.</b> CAMP test of <i>Streptococcus agalactiae</i>, strain 09mas018883, (the vertical streak A) with <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> (the horizontal streak). <i>Streptococcus uberis</i> (the vertical streak B) is used as negative control. Note that the β-hemolysis of <i>S. aureus</i> is enhanced by <i>S. agalactiae</i> at the arrow, which it is not by the control. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-04-06. <p>
S. agalactiae 
<b>Fig. 207:6.</b> CAMP test of <i>Streptococcus canis</i>, strain CCUG 37323 (the horizontal streak B) with <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> (the vertical streak). <i>Streptococcus agalactiae</i> (the horizontal streak A) is used as positive control and <i>Streptococcus dysgalactiae</i> subsp. <i>dysgalactiae</i> (the horizontal streak C) is used as negative control. . Note that the β-hemolysis of <i>S. aureus</i> is not enhanced by <i>S. canis</i> as of the control at the arrow. Date: 2011-06-08. <p>
S. canis 
<strong>Fig. 68:4.</strong>Motility test of <i>Escherichia coli</i>. A, negative control (a non-motile bacterium). Only turbidity in the "streak"; B, <i>E. coli</i>. Note the complete turbidity in the medium.</p>
<p>
E. coli 
<p><b>Fig. 126:2.</b> Close up of colonies of <i>Dermatophilus congolensis</i>. This figure is left on VetBact for historical reasons. It is the first figure that we included in VetBact (around year 2006).</p>
D. congolensis 
<strong>Fig. 15:3.</strong> Close up of colonies of <i>Streptococcus equi</i> subsp. <i>zooepidemicus</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar. Photography with light from below. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm.  <p>
S. eq. zooepid. 
<b>Fig. 20:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, strain SLV 350, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The lighting was from above and the hemolysis is, therefore, hardly visible (c.f. Fig. 20:3). The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-01-31.<p>
S. au. aureus 
<b>Fig. 20:2.</b> Close up of colonies of <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, strain SLV 350, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The lighting was from above and the hemolysis is, therefore, not visible (c.f. Fig. 20:4). The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-02-01.<p>
S. au. aureus 
<strong>Fig. 22:1.</strong> Close up of colonies of <i>Staphylococcus intermedius</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm.  <p>
S. intermedius 
<strong>Fig. 217:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Aliivibrio salmonicida</i>, strain LFI1238, cultivated on blood agar with 0.9% NaCl during 6 days at 12°C. Panel A shows the agar plate and panel B is a close-up of the colonies. Date: 2014-12-01.</p>
A. salmonicida 
Close up of colonies of <i>Streptococcus equi</i> subsp. <i>equi</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm.  <p>
S. eq. equi 
<p><strong>Fig. 107:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Actinobacillus equuli</i> subsp. <i>equuli</i>, strain CCUG 2041, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar at 37°C during 24 h. The image shows a plate, which has been photographed with lighting from below to see if hemolysis has occured. This bacterium do not produce hemolysis on blood agar. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2016-10-11.</p><p> </p>
A. eq. equuli 
<p><strong>Fig. 37:1. </strong>Colonies of <em>Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae</em> cultivated on commersially Mycoplasma-Experience medium at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub> during 7 days. The strain has been isolated from a pig in Switzerland. The colonies have been photographed through a microscope and Fig. B is partial close-up of Fig. A. Note that the colonies do not have a clearly defined nipple. The whole length of the scale bars is equivalent to 1 mm. Date: 2016-12-19.</p>

<p> </p>
M. hyopneumoniae 
<b>Fig. 133:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Bacillus subtilis</i> subsp. <i>subtilis</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 mm. <p>
B. su. subtilis 
<b>Fig. 53:3</b>. Colonies of <i>Bordetella bronchiseptica</i>, strain xxx, cultivated on A, purple agar with lactose and B, McConkey agar at 37°C during 48 h. The length of the scale bars corresponds to 10 mm.
<p>
B. bronchiseptica 
<p><b>Fig. 65:4.</b> Colonies of <i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa</i>, strain CCUG 17619, cultivated on purple agar with lactose at 37°C during 24 h. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm.</p>
P. aeruginosa 
<p><strong>Fig. 85:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Listonella anguillarum</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar at 30°C. A. Cultivation during 24 h; B. Cultivation during 48 h. The images A and B are close-ups of Fig. 85:1 A and B, respectively. The total length of the respective scale bars is equivalent to 4 mm.</p>
L. anguillarum 
<b>Fig. 89:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Campylobacter jejuni</i> subsp. <i>jejuni</i> cultivated on blood agar.<p>
C. je. jejuni 
<strong>Fig. 124:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Enterococcus faecalis</i>, strain CCUG 9997, cultivated on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The image shows a plate, which has been photographed with lighting from below to see if hemolysis has occured. This bacterium do not produce hemolysis on blood agar. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 mm. Date: 2016-10-17.</p>
E. faecalis 
<strong>Fig. 29:1.</strong> Close up of colonies of <i>Clostridium perfringens</i> type C (strain CCUG 2026) cultivated on FAA agar during 24 h. <p>
C. perfringens 
<strong>Fig. 137:1.</strong> Close up of colonies of <i>Taylorella asinigenitalis</i> (strain Bd 3751/05) cultivated on hematin agar during 48 h. Cf. <i>Taylorella equigenitalis</i>, which was cultivated on the same agar plate. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. <p>
T. asinigenitalis 
Close up of colonies of <i>Taylorella equigenitalis</i> (strain CCUG 16464) cultivated on hematin agar during 48 h. Cf. <i>Taylorella asinigenitalis</i>, which was cultivated on the same agar plate. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. <p>
T. equigenitalis 
<strong>Fig. 71:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Plesiomonas shigelloides</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar at 37 °C during 24 h. The plate was photographed with lighting from below to see if hemolysis has occured. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2016-11-02.</p>
P. shigelloides 
<strong>Fig. 25:3.</strong> Close up of streak of <i>Clostridium chauvoei</i> (strain AN 2548/02) cultivated on FAA agar during 24 h. This strain of  <i>C. chauvoei</i> does not form discrete colonies. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. <p>
C. chauvoei 
<strong>Fig. 29:2.</strong> Close up of colonies of <i>Clostridium perfringens</i> type C (strain CCUG 2026) cultivated on bovine blood agar during 24 h. Note the double hemolysis zone! <p>
C. perfringens 
<strong>Fig. 30:1.</strong> Close up of colonies of <i>Clostridium septicum</i> (strain AN 3062/04) cultivated on FAA agar during 24 h. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. <p>
C. septicum 
<p><strong>Fig. 31:1.</strong> Close up of colonies of <i>Paeniclostridium sordellii</i> (stam AN 1562/05) cultivated on FAA agar during 24 h.</p>

<p> </p>
P. sordellii 
<strong>Fig. 132:1.</strong>Colonies of <i>Brachyspira intermedia</i> (strain PWS/A<sup>T</sup>) cultivated on FAA agar at 42°C during 72 h.
<p>
B. intermedia 
<p><b>Fig. 97:1</b>. Colonies of <i>Brachyspira hyodysenteriae</i> (strain B78<sup>T</sup>) cultivated on FAA agar at 42°C during 72 h.</p>

<p> </p>
B. hyodysenteriae 
<b>Fig. 97:2</b>. Colonies of <i>Brachyspira hyodysenteriae</i> (strain B78<sup>T</sup>) cultivated on FAA agar at 42°C during 72 h. Note the strong hemolysis and c.f. <i>Brachyspira pilosicoli</i>. <p>
B. hyodysenteriae 
<b>Fig. 98:1</b>. Colonies of <i>Brachyspira pilosicoli</i> (strain P43/6/78<sup>T</sup>) cultivated on FAA agar at 42°C during 72 h. <p>
B. pilosicoli 
<b>Fig. 98:2</b>. Colonies of <i>Brachyspira pilosicoli</i> (strain P43/6/78<sup>T</sup>) cultivated on FAA agar at 42°C during 72 tim. Note the weak hemolysis and c.f. <i>Brachyspira hyodysenteriae</i>. <p>
B. pilosicoli 
<strong>Fig. 5:2.</strong> Close up of colonies of <i>Mycobacterium avium</i> subsp. <i>paratuberculosis</i>, strain ATCC 19698, in a culture tube with Lövenstein-Jensen medium containing mycobactin after 3 months of incubation at 37°C. <p>
M. av. paratuber. 
<p><strong>Fig. 131:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Brachyspira alvinipulli</i> (strain C1<sup>T</sup>) cultivated on FAA agar at 42°C after 72 h.</p>

<p> </p>
B. alvinipull 
<b>Fig. 53:1</b>. Colonies of <i>Bordetella bronchiseptica</i>, strain xxx, cultivated on bovine blood agar at 37°C during 48 h. Lighting from above during photography. B is a partial close-up of A. The length of the scale bars in A and B corresponds to 10 and 5 mm, respectively.
<p>
B. bronchiseptica 
<p><strong>Fig. 21:2.</strong> Colonies of <em>Bacillus cereus</em> cultivated on bovine blood agar. Note the strong hemolysis zone. The total length of the scale bar corresponds to 10 mm.</p>

<p> </p>
B. cereus 
<strong>Fig. 162:1. </strong>Colonies of <i>Clostridium haemolyticum</i> cultivated on FAA agar during 48 h. The bacteria swarm and the hemolysis extends over almost the entire plate. <p>
C. haemolyticum 
<p><strong>Fig. 160:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Acholeplasma laidlawii</i>, strain C426/00, after incubation during 4 days on NPR-agar at 37°C. Note the colony appearence ("fried egg"), which is typical for many mycoplasmas (<i>Mollicutes</i>).</p>
A. laidlawii 
<strong>Fig. 23:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus hyicus</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The plate is photographed under light from below to facilitate observation of possible hemolysis. The total lengths of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm . Date: 2014-10-24.<p>
S. hyicus hyicus 
<p><b>Fig. 194:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Brucella canis</i>, strain BKT 41247/11, cultivated on Farrell&#39;s selective medium. A, overwiew of the agar plate where the length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. B, close-up of colonies where the total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-10-05.</p>
B. canis 
<strong>Fig. 27:1.</strong> Close up of colonies of <i>Clostridium novyi</i> type B (series no. 2343/87) cultivated on FAA agar during 48 h. The colonies are very small and can easily form a continuous carpet on the plate (the bacteria swarm). <p>
C. novyi 
<strong>Fig. 162:2.</strong> Close up of colonies of <i>Clostridium haemolyticum</i>, strain Argentina 1989, coltivated on FAA agar during 48 h. The colonies often forms a carpet on the plate (the bacteria swarm). <p>
C. haemolyticum 
<p><strong>Fig. 13:2.</strong> Close up of colonies of <i>Listeria monocytogenes</i>, strain SLV 365, cultivated during 24 h at 37°C on bovine blood agar. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm.</p>

<p> </p>
L. monocytogen. 
<p><strong>Fig. 13:1.</strong>Colonies of <i>Listeria monocytogenes</i>, strain SLV 365, cultivated during 24 h at 37°C on bovine blood agar. Note the thin zone hemolysis around the colonies.</p>

<p> </p>
L. monocytogen. 
<p><b>Fig. 65:5.</b> Colonies of <i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa</i>, strain ATCC 27853, cultivated on TS (tryptone-Soya) agar during 24 h at 37°C. Note the green pigment colour (pyoverdin).</p>

<p> </p>
P. aeruginosa 
<p><strong>Fig. 142:1. </strong>Colonies of <i>Citrobacter freundii</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C.</p>

<p> </p>
C. freundii 
<p><strong>Fig. 142:2. </strong>Colonies of <i>Citrobacter freundii</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm.</p>

<p> </p>
C. freundii 
<p><strong>Fig. 5:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Mycobacterium avium</i> subsp. <i>paratuberculosis</i>, strain ATCC 19698, in a culture tube with Lövenstein-Jensen medium containing mycobactin after 7(!) months of incubation at 37°C.</p>

<p> </p>
M. av. paratuber. 
Colonies of <i>Flavobacterium psychrophilum</i> (strain F439) cultivated on TYES agar at 20°C during 4 days. <p>
F. psychroph. 
Close up of colonies of <i>Flavobacterium psychrophilum</i> (strain F439) cultivated on TYES agar at 20°C during 4 days. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. <p>
F. psychroph. 
Colonies of <i>Vibrio vulnificus</i>, strain VV100, cultivated on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°. Note the hemolysis around the colonies. <p>
V. vulnificus 
Close up of colonies of <i>Vibrio vulnificus</i>, strain VV100, cultivated on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. <p>
V. vulnificus 
Colonies of <i>Flavobacterium psychrophilum</i> (strain F442) cultivated on KDMC agar during 4 days at 20°C. <p>
F. psychroph. 
Close up of colonies of <i>Flavobacterium psychrophilum</i> (strain F442) cultivated on KDMC agar during 4 days at 20°C. The total length of the scale bar corresponds to 5 mm. <p>
F. psychroph. 
<p><strong>Fig. 61:1. </strong>Colonies of <i>Nicoletella semolina</i> (strain BKT 9455/08) cultivated on horse blood agar during 48 h at 37°C in 5% CO<sub>2</sub>.</p>

<p> </p>
N. semolina 
<p><strong>Fig. 61:3. </strong>Close up of colonies of <i>Nicoletella semolina</i> (strain BKT 9455/08) cultivated on horse blood agar during 48 h at 37°C in 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm.</p>

<p> </p>
N. semolina 
<p><strong>Fig. 61:4. </strong>Close up of colonies of <em>Nicoletella semolina</em> (strain BKT 9455/08) cultivated on horse blood agar during 48 h at 37°C in 5% CO2. It is possible to move the colonies on the agar surface by means of a plastic loop.</p>

<p> </p>
N. semolina 
<p><strong>Fig. 61:2. </strong>Close up of colonies of <i>Nicoletella semolina</i> (strain BKT 9455/08) cultivated on horse blood agar during 48 h at 37°C in 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm.</p>

<p> </p>
N. semolina 
<p><strong>Fig. 167:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Francisella noatunensis</i> (strain �?391) cultivated on cysteine agar during 3 weeks at 20°C.</p>

<p> </p>
F. noatunensis 
<p><strong>Fig. 167:2.</strong> Close up of colonies of <i>Francisella noatunensis</i> (strain �?391) cultivated on cysteine agar during 3 weeks at 20°C. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm.</p>

<p> </p>
F. noatunensis 
<p>Colonies of <i>Vibrio vulnificus</i>, strain VV100, cultivated on TCBS cholera agar during 24 h at 37°.</p>

<p> </p>
V. vulnificus 
Close up of colonies of <i>Vibrio vulnificus</i>, strain VV100, cultivated on TCBS cholera agar during 24 h at 37°. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. <p>
V. vulnificus 
<p><strong>Fig. 24:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, type C, strain BKT 218387/08, cultivated on McClung-Toabe-agar during 48 h at 37°C under anaerobic conditions. Note the precipitation of fatty acids around the colonies due to the presence of lecithinase in these bacteria.</p>

<p> </p>
C. botulinum 
<p><strong>Fig. 24:2.</strong> Close-up of kolonies of <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, type C, strain BKT 218387/08, cultivated on McClung-Toabe agar during 48 h at 37°C under anaerobic conditions. Note the precipitation of fatty acids around the colonies due to the presence of lecithinase in these bacteria. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 mm.</p>

<p> </p>
C. botulinum 
<p><strong>Fig. 34:2.</strong> Immunofluorescense photomicrograph of colonies of <i>Mycoplasma bovis</i> strain BKT032768/08, cultivated on NPR agar during 5 days at 37°C with CO<sub>2</sub>.</p>

<p> </p>
M.bovis 
<p><strong>Fig. 34:1.</strong> Photomicrograph of colonies av <em>Mycoplasma bovis</em> strain BKT032768/08, cultivated on NPR agar during 5 days at 37°C with CO<sub>2</sub>. The colonies are 0,1-1 mm in diameter. Note the &#39;fried egg-appearence&#39;, which is typical for most mycoplasmas.</p>

<p> </p>
M. bovis 
<p><strong>Fig. 178:1.</strong> Photomicrograph of colonies of <em>Mycoplasma felis</em> strain M4-00, cultivated on NPR agarose during 4 days at 37°C with 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The colonies are 0,1-0,3 mm in diameter. Note the "fried egg-appearence", which is typical for most mycoplasmas.</p>

<p> </p>
M. felis 
<p><strong>Fig. 36:1.</strong> Photomicrograph of colonies of <em>Mycoplasma gallisepticum</em> strain ALD002107/08, cultivated on M agar during 6 days at 37°C with 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The colonies are 0,1-0,5 mm i diameter. Note the typical "fried egg-appearence", which most mycoplasmas have, but <em>M. gallisepticum</em> has a very tiny "yolk".</p>

<p> </p>
M. gallisept. 
<strong>Fig. 140:2.</strong> Closeup of colonies of "<i>Brachyspira suanatina</i>", strain AN4859/03, cultivated on FAA agar during 3 days at 42°C in an anaerobic jar. <p>
B. suanatina 
<p><strong>Fig. 140:1.</strong>Colonies of "<i>Brachyspira suanatina</i>" strain AN4859/03, cultivated on FAA agar during 3 days at 42°C in an anaerobic jar. Note the strong hemolysis, which is best visualized with light from below.</p>

<p> </p>
B. suanatina 
<p><strong>Fig. 25:2.</strong> Close-up of colonies of <i>Clostridium chauvoei</i>, strain JF3703, cultivated on bovine blood agar during 3 days at 37°C under anaerobic conditions. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. The strain originates from Professor Joachim Frey, Bern.</p>

<p> </p>
C. chauvoei 
<strong>Fig. 25:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Clostridium chauvoei</i>, strain JF3703, cultivated on bovine blood agar during 3 days at 37°C under anaerobic conditions. Note the strong hemolysis, which can be observed with light from below. The strain originates from Professor Joachim Frey, Bern. <p>
C. chauvoei 
<p><strong>Fig. 26:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Clostridioides difficile</i>, strain ???, cultivated anaerobically on a FAA plate at 37°C during 48 h. Panel A shows the whole plate and panel B shows a close-up, where the irregular and somewhat diffuse colonies can be observed. The total length of the scale bars are 10 and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-09-08.</p>

<p> </p>
C. difficile 
<strong>Fig. 188:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Treponema pedis</i>, strain TA 4, cultivated anaerobically on an FAA plate at 37°C during 8 days. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 mm. <strong>Lighting from below</strong> during photography which makes the strong hemolysis clearly visible. Date: 2016-03-18.</p>
T. pedis 
<p><strong>Fig. 139:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Treponema phagedenis</i>, strain V1, cultivated anaerobically on an FAA plate at 37°C during 8 days. Image B is a close-up of the plate in image A. The lengths of the scale bars in A and B are equivalent to 10 and 5 mm, respectively. <strong>Lighting from above</strong> during photography. It is difficult to discern the colonies, because they are very thin. Date: 2016-03-18.</p>

<p> </p>
T. phagedenis 
<strong>Fig. 139:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Treponema phagedenis</i>, strain V1, cultivated anaerobically on an FAA plate at 37°C during 8 days. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 mm. <strong>Lighting from below</strong> during photography which makes the strong hemolysis clearly visible, although the colonies are difficult to discern. Date: 2016-03-18.</p>
T. phagedenis 
<p><strong>Fig. 109:1.</strong> Colonies of <em>Campylobacter coli</em>, strain SLV427, cultivated microaerophilcally on bovine blood agar at 37°C during 48 h. Photographed with lighting from above. A, overview of the plate; B, close-up. The lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to 10 and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-05-19.</p>

<p> </p>
C. coli 
<strong>Fig. 109:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Campylobacter coli</i>, strain SLV427, cultivated microaerophilically on bovine blood agar at 37°C during 48 h. Photographed <strong>with lighting from below to show if there are hemolysis zones around the colonies</strong>. A, overview of the whole plate; B, close-up. The images show that <i>C. coli</i> is not hemolyzing on bovine blood agar. The lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to 10 and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-05-19.</p>
C. coli 
<p><strong>Fig. 103:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> cultivated on an FAA plate at 37°C during 48 h. Panel A shows the whole plate and panel B shows a close-up. The total length of the scale bars is equivalent to 10 and 3 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-09-08.</p>

<p> </p>
F. nec. necrophorum 
<p><strong>Fig. 110:1.</strong> Colonies of <em>Campylobacter upsaliensis</em>, strain CCUG 14913, cultivated microaerophilically on bovine blood agar at 37°C during 48 h. A, overview of the plate; B, close-up. Note that this bacterium has a tendency to swarm on bovine blood agar. The lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to 10 and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-06-01.</p>

<p> </p>
C. upsaliensis 
<strong>Fig. 86:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Aeromonas hydrophila</i> subsp. <i>hydrophila</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The image shows the whole plate, which has been photographed with lighting from below, to show that this bacterium gives hemolysis on blood agar. The total length of the scalebar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2016-10-11.</p>
A. hydr. hydrophila 
<p><strong>Fig. 86:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Aeromonas hydrophila</i> subsp. <i>hydrophila</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The image A shows the whole plate and image B is a close-up of A. The total length of the scale bars is equivalent to 10 and 3 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-10-11.</p>

<p> </p>
A. hydr. hydrophila 
<strong>Fig. 124:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Enterococcus faecalis</i>, strain CCUG 9997, cultivated on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The image A shows the whole plate and image B is a close-up of A. The total length of the scale bars is equivalent to 10 and 3 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-10-17.</p>
E. faecalis 
<strong>Fig. 190:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Enterococcus faecium</i>, VRE strain, cultivated on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The image A shows the whole plate and image B is a close-up of A. The total length of the scale bars is equivalent to 10 and 3 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-10-18.</p>
E. faecium 
<strong>Fig. 190:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Enterococcus faecium</i>, VRE strain, cultivated on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The image shows a plate, which has been photographed with lighting from below to see if hemolysis has occured. This bacterium do not produce hemolysis on blood agar. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 10 mm. Date: 2016-10-18.</p>
E. faecium 
<strong>Fig. 85:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Listonella anguillarum</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar at 30°C. A. Cultivation during 24 h; B. Cultivation during 48 h. The total length of the respective scale bars is equivalent to 1 cm. <p>
L. anguillarum 
<p><strong>Fig. 85:3.</strong> Colonies of <i>Listonella anguillarum</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar at 30°C. The agar plates were photographed with lighting from below to show hemolysis. A. Cultivation during 24 h; B. Cultivation during 48 h. The total length of the respective scale bars is equivalent to 1 cm.</p>

<p> </p>
L. anguillarum 
<p><strong>Fig. 71:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Plesiomonas shigelloides</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar at 37 °C during 24 h. Image B is a close-up of image A. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm and 3 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-11-02.</p>

<p> </p>
P. shigelloides 
<strong>Fig. 87:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Aeromonas salmonicida</i> subsp. <i>salmonicida</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar at ambient temperature during 24 h. In spite of the fact that the plate was photographed with lighting from below, hemolysis was difficult to see. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2016-11-02.</p>
A. salm. salmonicida 
<p><strong>Fig. 87:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Aeromonas salmonicida</i> subsp. <i>salmonicida</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar at ambient temperature during 48 h. Image B is a close-up of image A. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm and 3 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-11-02.</p>

<p> </p>
A. salm. salmonicida 
<p><strong>Fig. 213:1.</strong> Colonies of <em>Mycoplasma hyorhinis</em> cultivated on commersially Mycoplasma-Experience medium at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub> during 7 days. The strain has been isolated from a pig in Switzerland. The colonies have been photographed through a microscope and Fig. B is partial close-up of Fig. A. Note that the colonies do not have a clearly defined nipple. The whole length of the scale bars is equivalent to 1 mm. Date: 2016-12-19.</p>
M. hyorhinis 
<b>Fig. 138:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Bartonella henselae</i>, strain Bart 198/03, cultivated aerobically on hematin agar with yeast extract during 9 days at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2010-09-08.
<p>
B. henselae 
<b>Fig. 138:2.</b> Closeup of colonies of <i>Bartonella henselae</i>, strain Bart 198/03, cultivated aerobically on hematin agar with yeast extract during 9 days at 37°C. in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 3 mm. Date: 2010-09-08.
<p>
B. henselae 
<p><b>Fig. 11:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Bacillus anthracis</i> from the <b>anthrax outbreak in Halland (Sweden) in December, 2008</b>.</p>

<p> </p>
B. anthracis 
Close up of colonies of <i>Melissococcus plutonius</i>, strain LMG 20360, cultivated under anaerobic conditions on basal medium agar during 6 days at 35°C. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. <p>
M. plutonius 
<strong>Fig. 55:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Bordetella pertussis</i>, cultivated on horse blood agar during 48 h at 37°C with 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The total scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. <p>
B. pertussis 
<strong>Fig. 55:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Bordetella pertussis</i>, cultivated on horse blood agar during 48 h at 37°C with 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. Note the hemolysis zone around the colonies.
<p>
B. pertussis 
<p><strong>Fig. 57:1. </strong>Colonies of <i>Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae</i>, strain CCUG 12837, cultivated for detection of satelitism on a horse blood agar plate with <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em>, strain CCUG 4151, streaked in the shape of a cross on a carpet of the bacterium to be investigated. The agar plate has beenincubated during 24 h at 37°C. Note the streak of <i>S. aureus</i> in the upper part of the image. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm.</p>

<p> </p>
A. pleuropneu. 
<b>Fig. 1.</b> Colonies of <i>Yersinia pestis</i>, strain Bombay 1 (which is virulent), cultivated on BHI Agar containing 0.05% congo red and 1% galactose. The agar plate has been incubated at 20°C during 48 h. Colonies of virulent strains, which possess the <i>pgm</i> locus for pigmentation, get a redish colour, whereas colonies of non-virulent strains are white (cf. Fig. 2). <p>
Y. pestis 
<b>Fig. 2.</b> Colonies of <i>Yersinia pestis</i>, strain EV76C (which is non-virulent), cultivated on BHI Agar containing 0.05% congo red and 1% galactose. The agar plate has been incubated at 20°C during 48 h. Colonies of virulent strains, which possess the <i>pgm</i> locus for pigmentation, get a redish colour (cf. Fig. 1), whereas colonies of non-virulent strains are white. <p>
Y. pestis 
<b>Fig. 3.</b> Colonies of <i>Yersinia pestis</i>, strain Bombay 1 (which is virulent), cultivated on BHI agar containing 0.05% congo red and 1% galactose. The agar plate has been incubated at 20°C during 48 h. Colonies of virulent strains, which possess the <i>pgm</i> locus for pigmentation, get a redish colour (cf. Fig. 1), whereas colonies of non-virulent strains are white (cf. Fig. 2). The figure is a close up of parts of Fig. 1 and the arrow shows a colony, where the bacteria has undergone a spontaneous deletion mutation in the <i>pgm</i> locus and are therefore greyish white. The length of the complete scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. <p>
Y. pestis 
<p><strong>Fig. 169:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Corynebacterium kutscheri</i>, strain JF5392, cultivated on TSA with 5% sheep blood during 24 h at 37°C and with 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The strain was isolated from a lymph node, with pathological lesions, from the lung of a mouse. A, overview av the agar plate. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. B, partial close-up of A. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Note the very small colonies.</p>

<p> </p>
C. kutscheri 
<p><strong>Fig. 72:1.</strong> Streak of <i>Proteus mirabilis</i> on bovine blood agar. Note that <i>Proteus</i> spp. swarm on blood agar and discrete colonies are, therefore not formed. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2016-10-19.</p>

<p> </p>
P. mirabilis 
<strong>Fig. 135:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus pseudintermedius</i>, strain VB 001/09, cultivated aerobically for 24 h on bovine blood agar at 37°C. Note the double zone of hemolysis. The arrows indicate the border between the first and second hemolysis zone (complete and partial hemolysis, respectively). The complete hemolysis is caused by an α-hemolysin and the partial by a β-hemolysin.
<p>
S. pseudoint. 
<strong>Fig. 135:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus pseudintermedius</i>, strain VB 001-09, cultivated aerobically for 24 h. on bovine blood agar at 37°C. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm.
<p>
S. pseudoint. 
<p><strong>Fig. 64:1.</strong>Colonies of <i>Legionella pneumophila</i> subsp.<i> pneumophila</i>, strain 28/93, cultivated aerobically during 48 h. on a Buffered Charcol Yeast Extract (BCYE) agar plate at 37°C.</p>

<p> </p>
L. pneu. pneu. 
<p><strong>Fig. 64:2.</strong> Close up of colonies of <i>Legionella pneumophila</i> subsp. <i>pneumophila</i>, strain 28/93, cultivated aerobically during 48 h. on a Buffered Charcol Yeast Extract (BCYE) agar plate at 37°C. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm.</p>

<p> </p>
L. pneu. pneu. 
<b>Fig. 21:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Bacillus cereus</i>, strain VB 002/09, cultivated aerobically during 24 h. on bovine blood agar at 30°C. Note the strong hemolysis zone.
<p>
B. cereus 
<strong>Fig. 15:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Streptococcus equi</i> subsp. <i>zooepidemicus</i>, strain VB 003/09, cultivated anaerobically during 24 h on bovine blood agar at 37°C. Photographed with light from above. Note the clear β-hemolysis zone around the colonies.
<p>
S. equi zooepid. 
<b>Fig. 67:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Moraxella bovis</i>, strain BKT 14841/10, cultivated on horse blood agar during 24 h at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. Note the hemolysis around the colonies. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2010-10-06. <p>
M. bovis 
<b>Fig. 56:2.</b> Closeup of colonies of <i>Pasteurella multocida</i> subsp. <i>multocida</i>, strain CCUG 224, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 3 days at 37°C. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2010-10-06. <p>
P. mu. multocida 
<p><b>Fig. 65:2.</b> Colonies of <i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa</i>, strain ATCC 27853, cultivated aerobically on horse blood agar during 3 days at 37°C. Note the typical metallic sheen of the colonies, which can be observed in certain lighting (cf. Fig 65:1). The length of scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2010-10-06.</p>

<p> </p>
P. aeruginosa 
<b>Fig. 10:4.</b> Closeup of colonies of <i>Rhodococcus equi</i> strain ..., cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 48 h at 37°C. The lighting was from below (hemolysis cannot be observed). The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-02-02.<p>
R. equi 
<p><b>Fig. 56:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Pasteurella multocida</i> subsp. <i>multocida</i>, strain CCUG 224, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 3 days at 37°C.</p>

<p> </p>
P. mu. multocida 
<b>Fig. 19:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Streptococcus uberis</i> on bovine blood agar (to the left) and esculine agar (to the right) after incubation during 24 h at 37°C. Note the darkening of the agar plate under the colonies on esculin agar. The length of the scale bars is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2010-10-01. </p>
S. uberis 
<p><strong>Fig. 106:1. </strong>Colonies of <i>Actinobacillus lignieresii</i>, strain B10375/10, cultivated aerobically and in the presence of 5% CO2 during 24 h on hemiatin agar at 37°C. The total length of the scale bar corresponds to 5 mm. Date: 2010-04-23.</p><p> </p>
A. lignieresii 
<p><strong>Fig. 106:3. </strong>Close up of colonies of <i>Actinobacillus lignieresii</i>, strain B10375/10, cultivated aerobically and in the presence of 5% CO2 during 24 h on chocolate agar at 37°C. The total length of the scale bar corresponds to 5 mm. Date: 2010-04-23.</p><p> </p>
A. lignieresii 
<b>Fig. 1:3.</b> Colonies of <i>Trueperella pyogenes</i>, strain CCUG 13230<sup>T</sup>, cultivated aerobically during 48 h on horse blood agar at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. Note the β-hemolysis, which is clearly visible around single colonies. The length of the scale bar corresponds to 1 cm. Date: 2010-05-20<p>
T. pyogenes 
<b>Fig. 1:4.</b> Close up of colonies of <i>Trueperella pyogenes</i>, strain CCUG 13230<sup>T</sup>, cultivated aerobically during 48 h on horse blood agar at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The image is a close-up of the plate in in Fig. 1:3. The total length of the scale bar corresponds to 5 mm. Date: 2010-05-20<p>
T. pyogenes 
<b>Fig. 1:2.</b> Colonies of <i>Trueperella pyogenes</i>, strain CCUG 13230<sup>T</sup>, cultivated aerobically during 24 h on horse blood agar at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. Note the β-hemolysis. Single colonies are hardly visible, but indicated with arrows. Cf. Fig. 1:3, where the agar plate was incubated for a longer time. The length of the scale bar corresponds to 1 cm. Date: 2010-05-28. <p>
T. pyogenes 
<p><b>Fig. 199:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Mannheimia granulomatis</i>, strain BKT 20776/10, cultivated aerobically during 24 h on hematin agar at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The length of the scale bar corresponds to 1 cm. Date: 2010-06-02.</p>

<p> </p>
M. granulomatis 
<p><b>Fig. 199:2.</b> Close up of colonies of <i>Mannheimia granulomatis</i>, strain BKT 20776/10, cultivated aerobically during 24 h on hematin agar at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The total length of the scale bar corresponds to 5 mm. Date: 2010-06-02.</p>

<p> </p>
M. granulomatis 
<p><b>Fig. 1.</b> Colonies of <i>Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae</i>, strain CCUG 221<sup>T</sup>, cultivated aerobically during 24 h on horse blood agar at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. Note the greenish α-hemolysis. Single colonies are possibly visible under the scale bar. Cf. Fig. 2. The length of the scale bar corresponds to 1 cm. Date: 2010-06-02.</p>

<p> </p>
E. rhusipat. 
<p><b>Fig. 2.</b> Close up of colonies of <i>Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae</i>, strain CCUG 221<sup>T</sup>, cultivated aerobically during 24 h on horse blood agar at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The total length of the scale bar corresponds to 5 mm. Date: 2010-06-03.</p>

<p> </p>
E. rhusipat. 
<p><b>Fig. 2. </b>Close up of colonies of <i>Clostridium tetani</i>, strain PAT 2483/10, cultivated anaerobically on FAA plates during 1 week at 37°C. A streak was performed with a plastic loop to show that bacteria are collected at the edges of the streak (see the arrow). The total length of the scale bar corresponds to 5 mm. The bacteria originate from a closed case of wound infection of a sheep. Date: 2010-06-10.</p>

<p> </p>
C. tetani 
<b>Fig. 19:2.</b> Closeup of colonies of <i>Streptococcus uberis</i> on bovine blood agar after cultivation during 24 h at 37°C. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2010-10-02. <p>
S. uberis 
<b>Fig. 60:3.</b> Colonies of <i>Mannheimia haemolytica</i>, strain PAT 4483/10, after cultivation on horse blood agar during 24 h at 37°Cin the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. It is difficult to see the weak hemolysis, which is hidden under the colonies. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2010-10-05. <p>
M. haemolytica 
<b>Fig. 60:4.</b> Closeup of colonies of <i>Mannheimia haemolytica</i>, strain PAT 4483/10, after cultivation on horse blood agar during 24 h at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. Light from above. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2010-10-05. <p>
M. haemolytica 
<b>Fig. 60:5.</b> Closeup of colonies of <i>Mannheimia haemolytica</i>, strain PAT 4483/10, after cultivation on horse blood agar during 24 h at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. Light from below. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2010-10-05. <p>
M. haemolytica 
<b>Fig. 60:6.</b> Closeup of colonies of <i>Mannheimia haemolytica</i>, strain PAT 4483/10, after cultivation on horse blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. Light from below. Nine of the colonies (at the arrows) have been removed with a plastic loop to visualize the hemolysis. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2010-10-05. <p>
M. haemolytica 
<b>Fig. 67:2.</b> Closeup of colonies of <i>Moraxella bovis</i>, strain BKT 14841/10, cultivated on horse blood agar during 24 h at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. Note the hemolysis around the colonies. Light from below. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2010-10-06. <p>
M. bovis 
<b>Fig. 67:3.</b> Closeup of colonies of <i>Moraxella bovis</i>, strain BKT 14841/10, cultivated on horse blood agar during 24 h at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. Light from above. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2010-10-06. <p>
M. bovis 
<b>Fig. 65:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa</i>, strain ATCC 27853, cultivated aerobically on horse blood agar during 3 days at 37°C. Light from below. The length of scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2010-10-06. <p>
P. aeruginosa 
<b>Fig. 65:3.</b> Closeup of colonies of <i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa</i>, strain ATCC 27853, cultivated aerobically on horse blood agar during 3 days at 37°C. The total length of scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2010-10-06. <p>
P. aeruginosa 
<b>Fig. 10:5.</b> Colonies of <i>Rhodococcus equi</i> strain ..., cultivated aerobically on purple lactose agar during 24 h at 37°C. The lighting was from above. Note the slimy, semi-fluid and pink coloured colonies as well as that lactose is not fermented. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-02-02.<p>
R. equi 
<b>Fig. 10:6.</b> Closeup of colonies of <i>Rhodococcus equi</i> strain ..., cultivated aerobically on purple lactose agar during 48 h at 37°C. The lighting was from above. Note the slimy, semi-fluid colonies wiyh pink colour. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-02-02.<p>
R. equi 
<b>Fig. 10:2.</b> Close up of colonies of <i>Rhodococcus equi</i> strain ..., cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 48 h at 37°C. The lighting was from above . The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-02-02.<p>
R. equi 
<strong>Fig. 77:1.</strong>  Colonies of <i>Yersinia enterocolitica</i> subsp. <i>enterocolitica</i>, strain 45643, cultivated on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 30°C. Note that a hemolysis zone cannot be observed. The lengths of the scale bars corresponds to 1 cm and 2 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-10-25. <p>
Y. enter. enterocol. 
<b>Fig. 205:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus epidermidis</i>, strain VB 005/11, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar at 37°C during 48 h. The length of the scale bars is equivalen to 1 cm. A, Photographed with light from above. B, Photographed with light from primarily below. Note that hemolysis cannot be observerved. Date: 2011-02-25. <p>
S. epidermidis 
<b>Fig. 205:2.</b> Close-up of colonies of <i>Staphylococcus epidermidis</i>, strain VB 005/11, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar at 37°C during 48 h. Photographed with light from above. Date: 2011-02-26. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm.<p>
S. epidermidis 
<b>Fig. 205:3.</b> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus epidermidis</i>, strain VB 005/11, cultivated aerobically on purple agar (with lactose) at 37°C during 24 h. Note that <i>S. epidermidis</i> ferments lactose. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Photographed with light from above. Date: 2011-02-26. <p>
S. epidermidis 
<b>Fig 16:3.</b> Colonies of <i>Streptococcus agalactiae</i>, strain 09mas018883, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar at 37 °C during 24 h. A, Photographed with lighting from above. B, Photographed with lighting from below. Note that a very thin hemolysis zone can be observed around the colonies on plate B. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. <p>
S. agalactiae 
<b>Fig. 16:4.</b> Close-up of colonies of <i>Streptococcus agalactiae</i>, strain 09mas018883, cultivated on bovine blood agar at 37°C during 24 h. Photographed with light from above. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-04-04. <p>
S. agalactiae 
<b>Fig. 16:5.</b> Close-up of colonies of <i>Streptococcus agalactiae</i>, strain 09mas018883, cultivated on bovine blood agar at 37°C during 24 h. Photographed with light from below. Note the thin zone of hemolysis around the colonies. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-04-04. <p>
S. agalactiae 
<b>Fig. 207:4.</b> Colonies of <i>Streptococcus canis</i>, strain CCUG37323, cultivated on A, purple agar (with lactose) and B, SELMA plate (SElective MAstitis medium). The colonies are rather small on purple agar, but it is evident that this bacterium ferments lactose. The SELMA plate contains a, bovine blood agar with esculine, b, mannitol salt agar and c, Mac Conkey agar. <i>S. canis</i> is only growing in field a, where most aerobic (and facultatively aerobic) bacteria can be grown. <i>S. canis</i> is esculinase positive. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-06-08. <p>
S. canis 
<b>Fig 207:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Streptococcus canis</i>, strain CCUG 37323, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar with aesculine at 37 °C during 24 h. A, Photographed with lighting from above. Note the dark colour of the agar plate. <i>S. canis</i> is easculinase positive. B, Photographed with lighting from below. Note the relatively broad hemolysis zone, which can be observed around the colonies on plate B. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-06-08. <p>
S. canis 
<b>Fig 207:2.</b> Colonies of <i>Streptococcus canis</i>, strain CCUG 37323, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar with aesculine at 37 °C during 24 h. Photographed with lighting from above. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-06-08. <p>
S. canis 
<b>Fig 207:1.</b> Close-up of colonies of <i>Streptococcus canis</i>, strain CCUG 37323, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar with aesculine at 37 °C during 24 h. Photographed with lighting from below. Note the relatively broad hemolysis zone, which can be observed around the colonies. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-06-08 <p>
S. canis 
<b>Fig 69:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Klebsiella pneumoniae</i> subsp. <i>pneumoniae</i>, strain CCUG 225, cultivated aerobically on horse blood agar at 37°C during 24 h. A, Photographed with lighting from above. B, Photographed with lighting from primarily below. Note that an hemolysis zone cannot be observed. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-06-16. <p>
K. pne. pneumoniae 
<b>Fig 69:2.</b> Close-up of colonies of <i>Klebsiella pneumoniae</i> subsp. <i>pneumonia</i>, strain CCUG 225, cultivated aerobically on horse blood agar at 37°C during 24 h. Photographed with lighting from above. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-06-20. <p>
K. pne. pneumoniae 
<b>Fig 69:3.</b> Close-up of colonies of <i>Klebsiella pneumoniae</i> subsp. <i>pneumoniae</i>, strain CCUG 225, cultivated aerobically on horse blood agar at 37°C during 24 h. Photographed with lighting primarily from below. Note that an hemolysis zone cannot be observed. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-06-20. <p>
K. pne. pneumoniae 
<b>Fig. 156:4</b>. Colonies of <i>Klebsiella oxytoca</i>, strain CCUG 15717<sup>T</sup>, cultivated aerobically on purple agar (with lactose) during 24 h at 37°C. Note the mucoid appearence of the colonies and that <i>K. oxytoca</i> ferments lactose. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-06-23. <p>
K. oxytoca 
<b>Fig 156:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Klebsiella oxytoca</i>, strain CCUG 15717, cultivated aerobically on horse blood agar at 37°C during 24 h. A, Photographed with lighting from above. B, Photographed with lighting from primarily below. Note that an hemolysis zone cannot be observed. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-06-23. <p>
K. oxytoca 
<b>Fig 156:2.</b> Close-up of colonies of <i>Klebsiella oxytoca</i>, strain CCUG 15717, cultivated aerobically on horse blood agar at 37°C during 24 h. A, Photographed with lighting from above. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-06-26. <p>
K. oxytoca 
<b>Fig 156:3.</b> Close-up pf colonies of <i>Klebsiella oxytoca</i>, strain CCUG 15717, cultivated aerobically on horse blood agar at 37°C during 24 h. Photographed with lighting from primarily below. Note that an hemolysis zone cannot be observed. The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-06-26. <p>
K. oxytoca 
<p><strong>Fig. 194:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Brucella canis</i>, strain BKT 41247/11, cultivated on horse blood agar. A, overwiew of the agar plate where the length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. B, close-up of colonies where the total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-10-05.</p>
B. canis 
<p><strong>Fig. 194:3.</strong> Colonies of <i>Brucella canis</i>, strain BKT 41247/11, cultivated on purple agar with lactose. A, overwiew of the agar plate where the length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. B, close-up of colonies where the total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-10-05.</p>
B. canis 
<p><strong>Fig. 194:4.</strong> Colonies of <i>Brucella canis</i>, strain BKT 41247/11, cultivated on TS agar. A, overwiew of the agar plate where the length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. B, close-up of colonies where the total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-10-08.</p>
B. canis 
<b>Fig. 70:3</b> Colonies of <i>Salmonella enterica</i> subsp. <i>enterica</i> serovar Dublin, strain SLV 242, cultivated on purple agar with lactose at 37°C during 24 h. A and B, with lighting primarely from above. C, with lighting primarirly from the side. Note the for salmonella typical cone shaped appearence of the colonies, which is best observed in C. The pale colonies around the arrow in C are i fact mirror images of colonies above. Thus, these colonies are seen from underneath (c.f. C, which shows the same area of the agar plate. The total lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to A, 1 cm; B and C, 5 mm. Date: 2012-01-19.
<p>
S. ent. enterica 
<p><b>Fig. 70:1</b> Colonies of <i>Salmonella enterica</i> subsp. <i>enterica</i> serovar Dublin, strain SLV 242, cultivated on bovine blood agar at 37°C during 24 h. A and B, with lighting primarely from above. C, with lighting primarerly from the side. Note the for salmonella typical cone shaped appearence of the colonies, which is best observed in C. The total lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to A, 1 cm; B and C, 5 mm. Date: 2012-01-19.</p>

<p> </p>
S. ent. enterica 
<b>Fig. 70:2</b> Colonies of <i>Salmonella enterica</i> subsp. <i>enterica</i> serovar Dublin, strain SLV 242, cultivated on bovine blood agar at 37°C during 24 h. Photographed with lighting primarely from below. Note that hemolysis cannot be observed. The lengths of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2012-01-19.
<p>
S. ent. enterica 
<b>Fig. 68:2.</b> Colonies of <i>Escherichia coli</i>, strain SLV 082, cultivated aerobically on blood agar at 37°C during 24 h. Photographed with light from primarily below. Note that hemolysis cannot be observed with this strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2012-03-01.
<p>
E. coli 
<b>Fig. 68:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Escherichia coli</i>, strain SLV 082, cultivated aerobically on blood agar at 37°C during 24 h. Photographed with lighting from primarily above. A, overview; B, close-up. The lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to 10 and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2012-03-01.
<p>
E. coli 
<b>Fig. 53:2</b>. Colonies of <i>Bordetella bronchiseptica</i>, strain xxx, cultivated on bovine blood agar at 37°C during 48 h. Lighting from below during photography. Note that a weak hemolysis can be observed within the encircled area of the plate. The length of the scale bar corresponds to 10 mm.
<p>
B. bronchiseptica 
<p><strong>Fig. 73:1.</strong> Cultivation of <i>Proteus vulgaris</i>, strain SLV 476, on a blood agar plate for 24 h at 37°C. Arrows point to one area where a colony is beginning to form, however, the bacteria are quickly spreading out a on the agar surface, because <i>P. vulgaris</i> swarms. The lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to 1 cm. The right image is a magnification of a part of the left one. Arrows point to the same colony. Date: 2013-12-25.</p>

<p> </p>
P. vulgaris 
<strong>Fig. 73:2.</strong> Cultivation of <i>Proteus vulgaris</i>, strain SLV 476, on a purple agar plate (with lactose) for 24 h at 37°C. The bacteria are quickly spreading out a on the agar surface, because <i>P. vulgaris</i> swarms. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2013-12-25.
<p>
P. vulgaris 
<p><strong>Fig. 38:1.</strong> Colonies of <em>Mycoplasma mycoides</em> subsp. <em>mycoides</em>, strain Gladysdale, cultivated on Eaton&#39;s agar under 2 days (A) and 4 days (B), respectively at 37°C and in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The total length of the scale bars is equivalent to 0.5 mm. Date: 2014-01-28.</p>

<p> </p>
M. mycoides 
<b>Fig. 60:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Mannheimia haemolytica</i>, strain PAT 4483/10, after cultivation on <strong>bovine blood agar</strong> during 24 h at 37°C. It is much easier to observe the hemolysis on bovine blood agar than on horse blood agar. The plate was photographed with light from below. A, the whole plate. B, close-up of A. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2014-10-22. <p>
M. haemolytica 
<b>Fig. 60:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Mannheimia haemolytica</i>, strain PAT 4483/10, after cultivation on <strong>bovine blood agar</strong> during 24 h at 37°C. The plate was photographed with light from below and the hemolysis is, therefore difficult to see. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2014-10-22. <p>
M. haemolytica 
<strong>Fig. 23:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus hyicus</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The plate is photographed under light from above. A, the whole plate. B, close-up of A. The total lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to 1 cm and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2014-10-24.<p>
S. hyicus hyicus 
<strong>Fig. 17:1.</strong> A. Colonies of <i>Streptococcus dysgalactiae</i> subsp. <i>dysgalactiae</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar at 37 °C during 24 h. The agar plate was photographed <strong>with light from above</strong>. B. Close-up of some colonies from the agar plate to the left. Here the weak α-hemolysis is visible, but it is more easily observed with light from below (see Fig. 17:2). The total length of the scale bars is equivalent to 1 cm and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2014-11-14.</p>
S. dysgal. dysgal. 
<strong>Fig. 17:2.</strong> A. Colonies of <i>Streptococcus dysgalactiae</i> subsp. <i>dysgalactiae</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar at 37 °C during 24 h. The agar plate was photographed <strong>with light from below</strong>. B. Close-up of some colonies from the agar plate to the left. The weak greenish α-hemolysis is visible in the panel. The total length of the scale bars is equivalent to 1 cm and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2014-11-12.</p>
S. dysgal. dysgal. 
<strong>Fig. 14:2.</strong> A. Colonies of <i>Streptococcus equi</i> subsp. <i>equi</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar at 37 °C during 48 h. The agar plate was photographed <strong>with light from below</strong>. B. Close-up of some colonies from the agar plate to the left. The clear β-hemolysis is visible in both panels. The total length of the scale bars is equivalent to 1 cm and 3 mm, respectively. Date: 2014-11-19.</p>
S. equi equi 
<strong>Fig. 14:1.</strong> A. Colonies of <i>Streptococcus equi</i> subsp. <i>equi</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar at 37 °C during 48 h. The agar plate was photographed <strong>with light from above</strong>. B. Close-up of some colonies from the agar plate to the left. The β-hemolysis is difficult to see, but it is more easily observed with light from below (see Fig. 14:2). The total length of the scale bars is equivaleent to 1 cm and 3 mm, respectively. Date: 2014-11-19.</p>
S. equi equi 
<p><strong>Fig. 16:2.</strong> A. Colonies of <i>Streptococcus agalactiae</i> cultivated, strain VB 0006/11, on bovine blood agar at 37 °C during 24 h. The agar plate was photographed <strong>with light from below</strong>. B. Close-up of some colonies from the agar plate to the left. The clear β-hemolysis can easily be seen in both panels. This strain has a coparatively broad zon of hemolysis. The total length of the scale bars is equivalent to 1 cm and 3 mm, respectively. Date: 2014-11-12.</p>
S. agalactiae 
<strong>Fig. 16:1.</strong> A. Colonies of <i>Streptococcus agalactiae</i>, strain VB 0006/11, cultivated on bovine blood agar at 37 °C during 24 h. The agar plate was photographed <strong>with light from above</strong>. B. Close-up of some colonies from the agar plate to the left. The β-hemolysis is difficult to see, but it is more easily observed with light from below (see Fig. 16:2). The total length of the scale bars is equivaleent to 1 cm and 3 mm, respectively. Date: 2014-11-14.</p>
S. agalactiae 
<strong>Fig. 15:1.</strong> A. Colonies of <i>Streptococcus equi</i> subsp. <i>zooepidemicus</i> cultivated on bovine blood agar at 37 °C during 48 h. The agar plate was photographed <strong>with light from above</strong>. B. Close-up of some colonies from the agar plate to the left. The β-hemolysis can bee seen in both panels, but it is more easily observed with light from below (see Fig. 15:2/3). The total length of the scale bars is equivaleent to 1 cm. Date: 2014-11-24.</p>
S. equi zooep. 
<strong>Fig. 189:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus schleiferi</i> subsp. <i>coagulans</i>, strain CCUG 37248, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The lighting was primarily from above in the left panel and only from above in the right panel and the hemolysis is, therefore, not visible (c.f. Fig. 189:2). Date: 2015-06-16.</p>
S. schleif. coag. 
<p><strong>Fig. 226:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus schleiferi</i> subsp. <i>coagulans</i>, strain CCUG 37248, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The lighting was primarily from below and the hemolysis is, therefore, clearly visible (c.f. Fig. 189:1). Date: 2015-06-16.</p>

<p> </p>
S. schleif. coag. 
<strong>Fig. 121:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Streptococcus dysgalactiae</i> subsp. <i>equisimilis</i>, strain CCUG 36637, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The lighting is from above, but it is still possible to see the hemolysis (c.f. Fig. 121:2). B shows a close-up of the plate in B. The total length of the scale bars is equivalent to 10 and 3 mm in A and B, respectively. Date: 2015-08-25. </p>
S dysgal. equisim. 
<p><strong>Fig. 121:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Streptococcus dysgalactiae</i> subsp. <i>equisimilis</i>, strain CCUG 36637, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The lighting is from and the hemolysis can easily be seen (c.f. Fig. 121:2). B shows a close-up of the plate in B. The total length of the scale bars is equivalent to 10 and 3 mm in A and B, respectively. Date: 2015-09-02.</p>

<p> </p>
S dysgal. equisim. 
<strong>Fig. 188:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Treponema pedis</i>, strain TA 4, cultivated anaerobically on an FAA plate at 37°C during 8 days. Image B is a close-up of the plate in  image A. The lengths of the scale bars in A and B are equivalent to 10 and 5 mm, respectively. <strong>Lighting from above</strong> during photography. Date: 2016-03-18.</p>
T. pedis 
<p><strong>Fig. 107:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Actinobacillus equuli</i> subsp. <i>equuli</i>, strain CCUG 2041, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar at 37°C during 24 h. Panel A shows the whole plate and panel B shows a close-up of the plate. The total length of the scale bars are equivalent to 10 and 3 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-10-06.</p>

<p> </p>
A. eq. equuli 
<strong>Fig. 226:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus schleiferi</i> subsp. <i>schleiferi</i>, strain CCUG 64084, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The lighting was primarily from above and the hemolysis is, therefore, not visible (c.f. Fig. 226:2). Date: 2015-12-03.</p>
S. schleiferi sch. 
<strong>Fig. 226:2.</strong> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus schleiferi</i> subsp. <i>schleiferi</i>, strain CCUG 64084, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The lighting was primarily from below and the hemolysis is, therefore, cleraly visible (c.f. Fig. 226:1). A, overview of the agarplate. B, close-up of colonies. Date: 2015-12-04.</p>
 
<p><b>Fig. 1. </b>Colonies aofv <i>Clostridium tetani</i>, strain PAT 2483/10, cultivated anaerobically on FAA plates during 1 week at 37°C. On the right hand side of the plate, Bacterial growth can be seen as very faint grayish streaks. If the plate is streaked with a plastic loop, bacteria are collected at the edges of the strek. (see arrows and c.f. Fig. 2). The bacteria originate from a recently closed case of wound infection of a sheep. Date: 2010-06-10.</p>

<p> </p>
C. tetani 
<b>Fig. 20:3.</b> Colonies of <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, strain SLV 350, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. Note the doubble hemolysis, which is visible with lighting from below. The black slanted arrows show the inner clear hemolysis zone and the blue horisontal arrows show the outer broad and diffuse hemolysis zone. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-01-24.<p>
S. au. aureus 
<b>Fig. 20:4.</b> Closeup of colonies of <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, strain SLV 350, cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. Note the doubble hemolysis, which is visible with lighting from below. The black slanted arrow shows the inner clear (complete) hemolysis zone (caused by an α-hemolysin) and the blue horisontal arrow shows the outer broad and diffuse (partial) hemolysis zone (caused by a β-hemolysin). The total length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2011-01-25.<p>
S. au. aureus 
<b>Fig. 10:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Rhodococcus equi</i> strain ..., cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The lighting was from above (c.f. Fig. 10:3). The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-02-02.<p>
R. equi 
<b>Fig. 10:3.</b> Colonies of <i>Rhodococcus equi</i> strain ..., cultivated aerobically on bovine blood agar during 24 h at 37°C. The lighting was from below (hemolysis cannot be observed). The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2011-02-02.<p>
R. equi 
<p><strong>Fig. 144:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Campylobacter lari</i>, strain Cb 227 - 99, cultivated microaerophilically on bovine blood agar at 37°C during 48 h. A, overview of the plate; B, close-up. The lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to 10 and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2016-06-01.</p>

<p> </p>
C. lari 
<p><strong>Fig. 104:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Dichelobacter nodosus</i>, strain AN484/05, cultivated anaerobically on FAA agar during 5 days at 37°C. Strain AN484/05 ia a so-called benign strain. Note the very thin colonies which are difficult to see unless the light is reflected in the agar plate. Image A shows the whole plate and image B is a partial close-up. The length of the scale bars is equivalent to 1 cm and 3 mm, respectively. Date: 2017-02-09.</p>

<p> </p>
D. nodosus 
<p><strong>Fig. 126:1</strong> Colonies of <i>Dermatophilus congolensis</i> cultivated on blood agar during 5 days at 37°C and in 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. Note the strong hemolysis and the irregular edge of the colonies. Image A shows the whole plate och and image B a partial close-up. The length of the scale bars is equivalent to 1 cm and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2017-08-29.</p>
D. congolensis 
<b>Fig. 1:1.</b> Colonies of <i>Trueperella pyogenes</i>, cultivated aerobically during 48 h on bovine blood agar at 37°C in the presence of 5% CO<sub>2</sub>. The plate was photographed with lighting from below to make the β-hemolysis clearly visible. Image B is a close-up of imaga A. The length of the scale bars corresponds to 1 cm and 5 mm, respectively. Date: 2017-10-04<p>
T. pyogenes 
<p><strong>Fig. 147:1.</strong> Colonies of <i>Streptococcus suis</i>, cultivated on horse blood agar in 5% CO<sub><font size="2">2</font></sub> during 24 h at 37°C. Image A and B show an α-hemolysing strain of <em>S. suis </em>to the left and a ß-hemolysing strain of <em>S. suis </em>to the right<em>. </em>Image A is photographed with lighting from above and image B with lighting from below where the hemolysis is more easily observed. See also Fig. 147:2. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 1 cm. Date: 2018-06-14.</p>
S. suis 
<p><strong>Fig. 147:2.</strong> Closeups of colonies of <i>Streptococcus suis</i>, cultivated on horse blood agar in 5% CO<sub><font size="2">2</font></sub> during 24 h at 37°C. Image A and B show an α-hemolysing strain of <em>S. suis</em> and image B and C show a ß-hemolysing strain of <em>S. suis</em><em>. </em>Image A and C are photographed with lighting from above and image B and D with lighting from below. Note the visual difference between α- and ß-hemolysis, which is best observed with lighting from below. The length of the scale bars is equivalent to 5 mm. Date: 2018-06-15.</p>
S. suis 
<b>Fig. 135:4.</b> Streak of 1, <i>Staphylococcus pseudintermedius</i>, strain SVA-MRSP-134; 2, <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>; 3, <i>Staphylococcus hyicus</i> cultivated on purple agar with maltose. Streak 2 and 3 are positive and negative controls, respectively. Note that <i>S. pseudintermedius</i> is negative (cf. a corresponding fermentation in a test tube).<p>
S. pseudintermedius 
<b>Fig. 205:5.</b> Streak of <i>Staphylococcus</i> spp. cultivated aerobically on purple agar (with maltose) at 37°C during 24 h. 1: <i>S. intermedius</i>, 2: <i>S. aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, strain SLV 350. 3: <i>S. epidermidis</i>, stam VB 005/11. Note that  <i>S. epidermidis</i> ferments maltose on purple agar plates in contrast to <i>S. intermedius</i>. Date: 2011-02-26. <p>
S. epidermidis 
<b>Fig. 20:6.</b> Streak of <i>Staphylococcus</i> spp. cultivated aerobically on purple agar (with maltose) at 37°C during 24 h. 1: <i>S. intermedius</i>, 2: <i>S. aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, 3: <i>S. epidermidis</i>. Note that <i>S. aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i> ferments maltose on purple agar plates in contrast to <i>S. intermedius</i>. Date: 2011-03-06. <p>
S. au. aureus 
<b>Fig. 22:3.</b> Streak of <i>Staphylococcus</i> spp. cultivated aerobically on purple agar (with maltose) at 37°C during 24 h. 1: <i>S. intermedius</i>, 2: <i>S. aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, 3: <i>S. epidermidis</i>. Note that <i>S. intermedius</i> does not ferment maltose on purple agar plates in contrast to other <i>Staphylococcus</i>. Date: 2011-03-06.
S. intermedius 
<p><b>Fig. 23:3.</b> Streak of 1, <i>Staphylococcus hyicus</i>, strain CCUG 15602; 2, <i>Staphylococcus pseudintermedius</i>; 3, <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i> cultivated on purple agar with maltose. Streak 2 and 3 are negative and positive controls, respectively. Date: 2011-10-11.</p>

<p> </p>
S. hyicus 
<p><strong>Fig. 70:4.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Salmonella enterica</i> subsp. <i>enterica</i>, serovar Typhimurium. The difference between A and B is the degree of magnification and the length of the scale bars is equivalen to 5 µm in both images. Date: 2012-04-03</p>

<p> </p>
S. ent. enterica 
<b>Fig. 67:4.</b> Gram staining of <i>Moraxella bovis</i>, strain BKT 14841/10. The arrows indicate bacteria that appear in pairs (common). The field B is a partial magnification (6 times) of A. The lengths of the scale bars corresponds to 5 µm. Date: 2011-03-24. <p>
Mor. bovis 
<p><b>Fig. 60:7.</b> Gram staining of <i>Mannheimia haemolytica</i>, strain PAT 4483/10. The length of the scale bar corresponds to 5 µm. Date: 2010-10-06.</p>

<p> </p>
M. haemolytica 
<strong>Fig. 162:3.</strong>Gram staining of <i>Clostridium haemolyticum</i>, strain Argentina 1989. The Gram staining was not successful and the bacteria appears to be gram negative.<p>
C. haemolyticum 
<b>Fig 138:3.</b> Gram staining of <i>Bartonella henselae</i>, strain Bart 198/03. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 µm. Date: 2010-09-09.
<p>
B. henselae 
<p><b>Fig. 20:5.</b> Gram staining of <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>.</p>

<p> </p>
S. au. aureus 
<b>Fig. 133:3.</b> Gram staining of <i>Bacillus subtilis</i> subsp. <i>subtilis</i>. The staining has not been efficient on all cells. <p>
B. su. subtilis 
<strong>Fig. 72:2.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Proteus mirabilis</i>. <p>
P. mirabilis 
<p><b>Fig. 60:9.</b> Gram staining of <i>Mannheimia haemolytica</i>.</p>

<p> </p>
M. haemolytica 
<strong>Fig. 22:2.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Staphylococcus intermedius</i>. <p>
S. intermedius 
Gram staining av <i>Streptococcus equi</i> subsp. <i>equi</i>. <p>
Str. eq. equi 
<strong>Fig. 15:5.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Streptococcus equi</i> subsp. <i>zooepidemicus</i>. <p>
Str. eq. zooepid. 
<b>Fig. 16:7.</b> Gram staining of <i>Streptococcus agalactiae</i>, strain VB 006/11. <p>
Str. agalactiae 
<p><b>Fig. 10:7.</b> Gram staining of <i>Rhodococcus equi</i>.</p>

<p> </p>
R. equi 
<p><strong>Fig. 107:3.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Actinobacillus equuli</i> subsp. <i>equuli</i>.</p><p> </p>
A. eq. equuli 
<p><strong>Fig. 142:3. </strong>Gram staining of <i>Citrobacter freundii</i>.</p>

<p> </p>
C. freundii 
<b>Fig. 23:3.</b>Gram staining of <i>Staphylococcus hyicus</i>. <p>
S. hyicus 
<p><strong>Fig. 86:3.</strong> Gram-färgning av <i>Aeromonas hydrophila</i> subsp. <i>hydrophila</i>.</p>

<p> </p>
A. hy. hydrophila 
<p><strong>Fig. 87:3.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Aeromonas salmonicida</i> subsp. <i> salmonicida</i>.</p>

<p> </p>
A. sa. salmonic. 
<strong> Fig. 85:4.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Listonella anguillarum</i>. <p>
L. anguillarum 
<p><strong>Fig. 77:2.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Yersinia enterocolitica</i> subsp. <i>enterocolitica</i>.</p>

<p> </p>
Y. en. enterocolit. 
<strong>Fig. 89:3.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Campylobacter</i> subsp. <i>jejuni</i>. <p>
C. je. jejuni 
<p><strong>Fig. 103:2</strong> Gram staining of <i>Fusobacterium</i> sp.</p>

<p> </p>
F. ne. necrophor. 
<strong>Fig. 29:3.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>. Note that the cells have not been evenly stained by the gram staining. <p>
C. perfringens 
<b>Fig 17:3.</b> Gram staining of <i>Streptococcus dysgalactiae</i> subsp. <i>dysgalactiae</i>. The bacteria have not been evenly stained and the chains could be longer. <p>
S. dy. dysgalact. 
<strong>Fig. 71:3.</strong> Gram staining av <i>Plesiomonas shigelloides</i>. <p>
P. shigelloides 
<strong>Fig. 27:2.</strong>Gram staining of <i>Clostridium novyi</i>, type B (series no. 2343/87). <p>
C. novyi 
<p><strong>Fig. 13:3.</strong>Gram staining of <i>Listeria monocytogenes</i>, strain SLV365.</p>

<p> </p>
L. monocytogen. 
<p><strong>Fig. 26:3.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Clostridioides difficile</i>, strain CCUG 4938.</p>

<p> </p>
C. difficile 
<p><strong>Fig. 61:5. </strong>Gram staning of <i>Nicoletella semolina</i>, strain BKT 9455/08.</p>

<p> </p>
N. semolina 
<p><strong>Fig. 61:6. </strong>Gram staning of <i>Nicoletella semolina</i>, strain BKT 9455/08.</p>

<p> </p>
N. semolina 
Gram staining of <i>Flavobacterium psychrophilum</i>, strain 442. <p>
F. psychroph. 
<p>Gram staining of <i>Renibacterium salmoninarum</i>, strain R.s 28/2.</p>

<p> </p>
R. salmoninar. 
<strong>Fig. 24:5.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, type C, strain BKT 218387/08. Clostridium spp. can be difficult to gram stain (they are gram labile). <p>
C. botulinum 
Gram staining of <i>Melissococcus plutonius</i>. Compare the scanning electron micrograph. <p>
M. plutonius 
<strong>Fig. 55:3.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Bordetella pertussis</i>.
<p>
B. pertussis 
<p><strong>Fig. 57:2. </strong>Gram staining of <i>Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae</i>, strain CCUG 12837T.</p>

<p> </p>
A. pleuropneu. 
<strong>Fig. 73:3.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Proteus vulgaris</i>, strain SLV 476. The right image is a partial magnification (2.5x) of the left one. The total length of the respective scale bars is equivalent to 5 µm and the scale bars are placed in the corresponding areas of the images. Date: 2013-12-23.
<p>
<p>
P. vulgaris 
<p><strong>Fig. 104:3.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Dichelobacter nodosus</i>, strain .....</p>

<p> </p>
D. nodosus 
<strong>Fig. 190:3.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Enterococcus faecium</i>, strain VRE 300/04. <p>
E. faecium 
<p><strong>Fig. 24:4.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, type C, strain 07-V891 from liquid culture.</p>

<p> </p>
C. botulinum 
<p><strong>Fig. 21:5.</strong> Gram staining of <em>Bacillus cereus</em>, strain VB 002/09.</p>

<p> </p>
B. cereus 
<strong>Fig. 15:4.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Streptococcus equi</i> subsp. <i>zooepidemicus</i>, strain VB 003/09. 
<p>
S. equi zooepid. 
<b>Fig. 67:5.</b> Gram staining of <i>Moraxella bovis</i>, strain BKT 14841/10. The arrows indicate bacteria that appear in pairs (common). The field B is a partial magnification (1.5 times) of A. The lengths of the scale bars corresponds to 5 µm. Date: 2011-03-24.
Mor. bovis 
<p><strong>Fig. 64:3.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Legionella pneumophila</i> subsp.<i>pneumophila</i>, strain 28/93. Carbol fuchsin has been used instead of saffranin for the contrast staining.</p>

<p> </p>
L. pneu. pneu. 
<p><strong>Fig. 106:3. </strong>Gram staining of <i>Actinobacillus lignieresii</i>, strain B10375/10. The length of the scale bar corresponds to 5 µm. Date: 2010-04-23.</p>

<p> </p>
A. lignieresii 
<p><strong>Fig. 106:4. </strong>Gram staining of <i>Actinobacillus lignieresii</i>, strain B10375/10. The arrows indicate some of the granules, which can be seen. The total length of the scale bar corresponds to 5 µm. Date: 2010-04-23.</p><p> </p>
A. lignieresii 
<p><b>Fig. 4.</b> Gram staining of <i>Trueperella pyogenes</i>, strain CCUG 13230<sup>T</sup>. The length of the scale bar corresponds to 5 µm. Date: 2010-05-21.</p>

<p> </p>
T. pyogenes 
<p><b>Fig 3. </b>Gram staining of <i>Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae</i>. Note the "cheese doodle" like appearence. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 µm. Date: 2010-06-03.</p>

<p> </p>
E. rhusipat. 
<p><b>Fig. 3.</b> Gram staining of <i>Clostridium tetani</i>, strain PAT 2483/10. The bacteria has started to sporulate and the arrows indicate positions of spores. Note the tennis racket or drumstick appearance of bacteria with spores. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 µm. The bacteria originate from a recently closed case of wound infection of a sheep. Date: 2010-06-14.</p>

<p> </p>
C. tetani 
<p><b>Fig. 60:8.</b> Gram staining of <i>Mannheimia haemolytica</i>, strain PAT 4483/10. The bacteria at the arrows are probably dividing. The length of the scale bar corresponds to 5 µm. Date: 2010-10-06.</p>

<p> </p>
M. haemolytica 
<p><b>Fig. 205:4.</b> Gram staining of <i>Staphylococcus epidermidis</i>, strain VB 005/11. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 µm. Date: 2011-03-14.</p>

<p> </p>
S. epidermidis 
<p><b>Fig. 56:3.</b> Gram staining of <i>Pasteurella multocida</i> subsp. <i>multocida</i>, strain CCUG 224. The field B is a partial magnification (3 times) of A. The length of the scale bar corresponds to 5 µm. Date: 2011-03-22.</p>

<p> </p>
P. mu. multocida 
<p><b>Fig. 65:6.</b>Gram staining of <i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa</i>, strain ATCC 27853. The field B is a partial magnification (3 times) of A. The length of the scale bar corresponds to 5 µm. Date: 2011-03-24.</p>

<p> </p>
P. aeruginosa 
<p><b>Fig. 16:6.</b> Gram staining of <i>Streptococcus agalactiae</i>, strain 09mas018883. Only the degree of magnification differ between the two pictures. The length of the scale bars is in both pictures equivalent to 5 µm. Date: 2011-04-11.</p>

<p> </p>
S. agalactiae 
<b>Fig. 19:3.</b> Gram staining of <i>Streptococcus uberis</i>, strain VB 004/11. Degree of magnification and field of view differ between the two pictures. The length of the scale bar is in both pictures equivalent to 5 µm. Date: 2011-04-11. <p>
S. uberis 
<b>Fig. 207:5.</b> Gram staining of <i>Streptococcus canis</i>, strain CCUG 37323. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 µm. Date: 2011-06-08. <p>
S. canis 
<p><b>Fig 156:5.</b> Gram staining of <i>Klebsiella oxytoca</i>, strain CCUG 15717 at two different degrees of magnification (A and B). The lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to 5 µm in both images. Date: 2011-08-30.</p>

<p> </p>
K. oxytoca 
<b>Fig 69:4.</b> Gram staining of <i>Klebsiella pneumoniae</i> subsp. <i>pneumoniae</i>, strain CCUG 225 at two different degrees of magnification (A and B). The lengths of the scale bars are equivalent to 5 µm in both images. Date: 2011-08-30. <p>
K. pneu. pneu. 
<p><b>Fig. 194:5.</b> Gram staining of <i>Brucella canis</i>, strain BKT 41247/11. Date: 2011-10-05.</p>
B. canis 
<p><b>Fig. 53:4</b>. Gram staining av <i>Bordetella bronchiseptica</i>, strain xxx. B is a partial close-up of A.</p>

<p> </p>
B. bronchiseptica 
<strong>Fig. 68:3.</strong> Gram staining of <i>Escherichia coli</i>, strain VB 008/14. The right image is a partial magnification (2.5x) of the left one. The total length of the respective scale bars is equivalent to 5 µm and the scale bars are placed in the corresponding areas of the images. Date: 2013-12-23.
<p>

<p>
E. coli 
<p><strong>Fig. 199:3. </strong>Gram staining of <i>Mannheimia granulomatis</i>, strain BKT 20776/10. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to 5 µm. Date 20010-06-10.</p>

<p> </p>
M. granulomatis 
<strong>Fig. 89:7.</strong> The tree shows the 16S rRNA based phylogenetic relations within the following bacterial genera: <i>Campylobacter, Helicobacter, Arcobacter, Burkholderia, Wolinella</i> and <i>Sulfurospirillum</i>. <p>
C. je. jejuni 
<strong>Fig. 109:5.</strong> The tree shows the 16S rRNA based phylogenetic relations within the following bacterial genera: <i>Campylobacter, Helicobacter, Arcobacter, Burkholderia, Wolinella</i> and <i>Sulfurospirillum</i>. <p>
C. coli 
<strong>Fig. 110:3.</strong> The tree shows the 16S rRNA based phylogenetic relations within the following bacterial genera: <i>Campylobacter, Helicobacter, Arcobacter, Burkholderia, Wolinella</i> and <i>Sulfurospirillum</i>. <p>
C. upsaliensis 
<p><strong>Fig. 90:2.</strong> The tree shows the 16S rRNA based phylogenetic relations within the following bacterial genera: <i>Campylobacter, Helicobacter, Arcobacter, Burkholderia, Wolinella</i> and <i>Sulfurospirillum</i>.</p>
C. fe. fetus 
<strong>Fig. 91:2.</strong> The tree shows the 16S rRNA based phylogenetic relations within the following bacterial genera: <i>Campylobacter, Helicobacter, Arcobacter, Burkholderia, Wolinella</i> and <i>Sulfurospirillum</i>. <p>
C. fe. venerealis 
<strong>Fig. 111:2.</strong> The tree shows the 16S rRNA based phylogenies within the following bacterial genera: <i>Campylobacter, Helicobacter, Arcobacter, Burkholderia, Wolinella</i> and <i>Sulfurospirillum</i>.<p>
A. butzleri 
<strong>Fig. 92:2.</strong> The tree shows the 16S rRNA based phylogenetic relations within the following bakterial genera: <i>Campylobacter, Helicobacter, Arcobacter, Burkholderia, Wolinella</i> and <i>Sulfurospirillum</i>. <p>
H. hepaticus 
<strong>Fig. 93:2.</strong> The tree shows the 16S rRNA based phylogenetic relations within the following bakterial genera: <i>Campylobacter, Helicobacter, Arcobacter, Burkholderia, Wolinella</i> and <i>Sulfurospirillum</i>. <p>
H. pylori 
<strong>Fig. 51:2.</strong> The tree shows the 16S rRNA based phylogenetic relations within the following bacterial genera: <i>Campylobacter, Helicobacter, Arcobacter, Burkholderia, Wolinella</i> and <i>Sulfurospirillum</i>. <p>
B. mallei 
<strong>Fig. 49:2.</strong> The tree shows the 16S rRNA based phylogenetic relations within the following bacterial genera: <i>Campylobacter, Helicobacter, Arcobacter, Burkholderia, Wolinella</i> and <i>Sulfurospirillum</i>. <p>
B. pseudomallei 
<p><strong>Fig. 97:6.</strong> The tree shows the 16S rRNA based phylogenetic relations within the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i>.
</p>
B. hyodysenteriae 
<strong>Fig. 140:3.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
B. suanatina 
<strong>Fig. 184:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
M. aeruginosa 
<strong>Fig. 218:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
C. muridarum 
<strong>Fig. 219:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
C. suis 
<strong>Fig. 171:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
C. trachomatis 
<strong>Fig. 94:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
C. abortus 
<strong>Fig. 220:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
C. caviae 
<strong>Fig. 95:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
C. felis 
<strong>Fig. 221:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
C. pecorum 
<strong>Fig. 222:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
C. pneumoniae 
<strong>Fig. 96:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
C. psittaci 
<strong>Fig. 102:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
B. fragilis 
<strong>Fig. 128:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
F. columnare 
<strong>Fig. 129:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
F. psychrophilum 
<strong>Fig. 96:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
P. gingivalis 
<strong>Fig. 96:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
P. levii 
<strong>Fig. 235:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
P. heparinolytica 
<strong>Fig. 164:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
P. melaninogenica 
<strong>Fig. 175:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
R. anatipestifer 
<strong>Fig. 151:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
F. canifelinum 
<strong>Fig. 152:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
F. equinum 
<strong>Fig. 153:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
F. necrophorum fund. 
<strong>Fig. 103:3</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
F. necrophorum necr. 
<strong>Fig. 183:1</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the following phyla: <i>Cyanobacteria, Chlamydiae, Bacteroidetes</i> and <i>Fusobacteria</i>, which are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-03-02.</p>
S. moniliformis 
<strong>Fig. 250:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-04-29.</p>
A. skirrowii 
<strong>Fig. 108:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-04-29.</p>
L. intracellularis 
<strong>Fig. 109:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
C. coli 
<strong>Fig. 90:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
C. fetus fetus 
<strong>Fig. 91:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
C. fetus venerealis 
<strong>Fig. 246:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
C. jejuni doylei 
<strong>Fig. 249:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
C. helveticus 
<strong>Fig. 247:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
C. hyointest. hyointest. 
<strong>Fig. 248:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
C. hyointest. lawsonii 
<strong>Fig. 89:6.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
C. jejuni jejuni 
<strong>Fig. 144:3.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
C. lari 
<strong>Fig. 110:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
C. upsaliensis 
<strong>Fig. 242:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
H. bilis 
<strong>Fig. 238:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
H. bizzozeroni 
<strong>Fig. 239:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
H. canis 
<strong>Fig. 243:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
H. heilmannii 
<strong>Fig. 92:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
H. hepaticus 
<strong>Fig. 245:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
H. mustelae 
<strong>Fig. 93:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
H. pylori 
<strong>Fig. 240:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page. Please note that the species name is misspellt in the figure.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
H. salomonis 
<strong>Fig. 244:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
H. suis 
<strong>Fig. 241:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-05-11.</p>
H. felis 
<strong>Fig. 9:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-01-12.</p>
M. tuberculosis 
<strong>Fig. 7:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-01-19.</p>
M. leprae 
<strong>Fig. 254:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-01-19.</p>
M. ulcerans 
<strong>Fig. 8:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-01-19.</p>
M. marinum 
<strong>Fig. 5:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-01-19.</p>
M. avium paratb. 
<strong>Fig. 9:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-01-19.</p>
M. avium avium 
<strong>Fig. 203:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which illustrates the relations between members of the genus <i>Clostridium</i> (<i>C.</i>). Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and the taxon in bold is included in this  bacterial page. Note that the species <i>C. botulinum</i> is distributed into four different phylogenetic groups. <i>C. botulinum</i> of toxin types B and F can also be found in group II.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Bacillus cereus</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and A-G refer to toxin type. Date: 2015-11-19.</p>
C. botulinum, II 
<strong>Fig. 202:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which illustrates the relations between members of the genus <i>Clostridium</i> (<i>C.</i>). Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page. Note that the species <i>C. botulinum</i> is distributed into four different phylogenetic groups. <i>C. botulinum</i> of toxin types B and F can also be found in group II.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Bacillus cereus</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and A-G refer to toxin type. Date: 2015-11-18.</p>
C. botulinum I 
<strong>Fig. 24:6.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which illustrates the relations between members of the genus <i>Clostridium</i> (<i>C.</i>). Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page. Note that the species <i>C. botulinum</i> is distributed into four different phylogenetic groups. <i>C. botulinum</i> of toxin types B and F can also be found in group II.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Bacillus cereus</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and A-G refer to toxin type. Date: 2015-11-19.</p>
C. botulinum, III 
<strong>Fig. 204:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which illustrates the relations between members of the genus <i>Clostridium</i> (<i>C.</i>). Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and the taxon in bold is included in this bacterial page. Note that the species <i>C. botulinum</i> is distributed into four different phylogenetic groups. <i>C. botulinum</i> of toxin types B and F can also be found in group II.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Bacillus cereus</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and A-G refer to toxin type. Date: 2015-11-19.</p>
 
<strong>Fig. 32:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which illustrates the relations between members of the genus <i>Clostridium</i> (<i>C.</i>). Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and the taxon in bold is included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Bacillus cereus</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2015-11-19.</p>
C. tetani 
<strong>Fig. 29:5.</strong> Fylogenetiskt träd, som illustrerar släktskap mellan medlemmar av genus <i>Clostridium</i> (<i>C.</i>). Blåmarkerade taxa är inkluderade i VetBact och taxonet i fet stil är aktuellt på denna bakteriesida.</p> 

<p>Trädet genererades med hjälp av datorprogrammet "Tree Builder" på <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDPs webbplats</a>. <i>Bacillus cereus</i> valdes som utgrupp. (T) betyder typstam. Datum: 2015-11-19.</p>
C. perfringens 
<strong>Fig. 30:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which illustrates the relations between members of the genus <i>Clostridium</i> (<i>C.</i>). Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and the taxon in bold is included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Bacillus cereus</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2015-11-19.</p>
C. septicum 
<strong>Fig. 25:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which illustrates the relations between members of the genus <i>Clostridium</i> (<i>C.</i>). Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and the taxon in bold is included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Bacillus cereus</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2015-11-19.</p>
C. chauvoei 
<strong>Fig. 27:3.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which illustrates the relations between members of the genus <i>Clostridium</i> (<i>C.</i>). Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and the taxon in bold is included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Bacillus cereus</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2015-11-19.</p>
C. novyi 
<strong>Fig. 162:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which illustrates the relations between members of the genus <i>Clostridium</i> (<i>C.</i>). Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and the taxon in bold is included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Bacillus cereus</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2015-11-19.</p>
C. haemolyticum 
<strong>Fig. 28:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which illustrates the relations between members of the genus <i>Clostridium</i> (<i>C.</i>). Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and the taxon in bold is included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Bacillus cereus</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2015-11-19.</p>
C. piliforme 
<p><strong>Fig. 26:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which illustrates the relations between members of the genus <i>Clostridium</i> (<i>C.</i>). Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and the taxon in bold is included in this bacterial page.</p>

<p> </p>

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Bacillus cereus</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2015-11-19.</p>
C. difficile 
<strong>Fig. 31:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which illustrates the relations between members of the genus <i>Clostridium</i> (<i>C.</i>). Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and the taxon in bold is included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Bacillus cereus</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2015-11-19.</p>
C. sordelli 
<strong>Fig. 22:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
S. intermedius 
<strong>Fig. 135:7.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
S. pseudint. 
<strong>Fig. 225:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
S. delphini 
<strong>Fig. 189:3.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
S. schleiferi coag. 
<strong>Fig. 226:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
S. schleiferi sch. 
<strong>Fig. 122:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
S. felis 
<strong>Fig. 23:5.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
S. hyicus 
<strong>Fig. 205:6.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
S. epidermidis 
<strong>Fig. 185:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
S. aureus anae. 
<strong>Fig. 20:11.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
S. aureus aure. 
<strong>Fig. 11:6.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
B. anthracis 
<strong>Fig. 21:7.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
 
<strong>Fig. 187:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
B. thuringiensis 
<strong>Fig. 133:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
B. subtilis sub. 
<strong>Fig. 12:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
B. licheniformis 
<strong>Fig. 163:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
B. thermosphacta 
<strong>Fig. 13:5.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
L. monocytogenes 
<strong>Fig. 186:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
L. innocua 
<strong>Fig. 168:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
L. ivanovii iva. 
<strong>Fig. 179:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
P. larvae 
<strong>Fig. 43:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
E. rhusiopathiae 
<strong>Fig. 227:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Bacillales</i>, which is indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the class <i>Bacilli</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i> and <i>Erysipelothrix (Ery.)</i> spp. The latter belongs to the class <i>Erysipelotrichia</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and <i>B.</i> in <i>B. thermosphacta</i> means <i>Brochothrix thermosphacta</i>, which is a spoilage bacterium.</p>
E. tonsillarum 
<p><strong>Fig. 147:3.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p>

<p> </p>

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
S. suis 
<strong>Fig. 144:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
S. pneumoniae 
<strong>Fig. 148:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
S. porcinus 
<strong>Fig. 19:8.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
S. uberis 
<strong>Fig. 16:10.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
S. agalactiae 
<strong>Fig. 16:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
S. pyogenes 
<strong>Fig. 207:7.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
S. canis 
<strong>Fig. 14:7.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
S. equi equi 
<strong>Fig. 182:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
S devriesei 
<strong>Fig. 180:5.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
M. plutonius 
<strong>Fig. 124:5.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
E. faecalis 
<strong>Fig. 190:5.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
E. faecium 
<strong>Fig. 143:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
L. plantarum plant. 
<strong>Fig. 158:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
P. indolicus 
<strong>Fig. 17:6.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
S. dysgalactiae dys. 
<strong>Fig. 121:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
S. dysgalactiae equisim. 
<strong>Fig. 191:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
S. equi rumin 
<strong>Fig. 15:8.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Lactobacillales</i> and closely related orders, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> except <i>Escherichia coli</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> (phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>) was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain and C refers to the toxin group.</p>
S. equi zooep. 
<strong>Fig. 146:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date 2015-12-10.</p>
R. prowazekii 
<strong>Fig. 228:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date 2015-12-10.</p>
R. helvetica 
<strong>Fig. 44:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date 2015-12-10.</p>
R. rickettsii 
<strong>Fig. 165:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
N. risticii 
<strong>Fig. 45:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date 2015-12-10.</p>
A. phagocytophilum 
<strong>Fig. 112:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date 2015-12-10.</p>
E. ruminantium 
<strong>Fig. 181:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date 2015-12-10.</p>
E. canis 
<strong>Fig. 48:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date 2015-12-10.</p>
B. suis 
<strong>Fig. 192:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date 2015-12-10.</p>
B. ceti 
<strong>Fig. 193:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date 2015-12-10.</p>
B. pinnipedialis 
<strong>Fig. 46:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date 2015-12-10.</p>
B. abortus 
<strong>Fig. 194:6.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date 2015-12-10.</p>
B. canis 
<strong>Fig. 47:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date 2015-12-10.</p>
B. melitensis 
<strong>Fig. 195:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date 2015-12-10.</p>
B. ovis 
<strong>Fig. 55:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
B. pertussis 
<strong>Fig. 196:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
B. clarridgieae 
<strong>Fig. 197:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
B. elizabethae 
<strong>Fig. 198:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
B. vinsonii berkh. 
<strong>Fig. 138:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
B. hensele 
<strong>Fig. 52:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
B. avium 
<strong>Fig. 53:6.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
B. bronchiseptica 
<strong>Fig. 138:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
B. parapertussis 
<strong>Fig. 137:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
T. asinigenitalis 
<strong>Fig. 50:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
T. equigenitalis 
<strong>Fig. 51:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
B. mallei 
<strong>Fig. 49:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
B. pseudomallei 
<strong>Fig. 174:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
N. gonorrhoeae 
<strong>Fig. 119:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-21.</p>
M. capricolum cap. 
<strong>Fig. 35:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-21.</p>
M. capricolum cpn. 
<strong>Fig. 229:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-21.</p>
M. leachii 
<strong>Fig. 206:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-21.</p>
M. mycoides capri 
<strong>Fig. 38:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-21.</p>
M. mycoides mycoides 
<strong>Fig. 209:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-27.</p>
U. diversum 
<strong>Fig. 39:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-27.</p>
M. pneumoniae 
<strong>Fig. 36:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-27.</p>
M. gallisepticum 
<strong>Fig. 42:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-27.</p>
M. haemofelis 
<strong>Fig. 41:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-27.</p>
M. suis 
<strong>Fig. 216:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-27.</p>
M. hyosynoviae 
<strong>Fig. 213:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-27.</p>
M. hyorhinis 
<strong>Fig. 230:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-27.</p>
M. dispar 
<strong>Fig. 37:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-27.</p>
M. hyopneumoniae 
<strong>Fig. 231:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-27.</p>
M. flocculare 
<strong>Fig. 40:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-28.</p>
M. pulmonis 
<strong>Fig. 215:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-28.</p>
M. meleagridis 
<strong>Fig. 34:3.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-27.</p>
M. bovis 
<strong>Fig. 33:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-28.</p>
M. agalactiae 
<strong>Fig. 178:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-28.</p>
M. felis 
<strong>Fig. 214:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-28.</p>
M. synoviae 
<strong>Fig. 160:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the class <i>Mollicutes</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Teniericutes</i> except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium botulinum</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The mycoplasmas of the mycoides group and the hemotropic mykoplasmas are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-28.</p>
A. laidlawii 
<strong>Fig. 134:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-09.</p>
T. paraluiscuniculi 
<strong>Fig. 100:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
Treponema pal. pallidum 
<strong>Fig. 188:3.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
T. pedis 
<strong>Fig. 139:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
T. phagedenis 
<strong>Fig. 111:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the different classes within the phylum <i>proteobacteria</i>. These classes are indicated with vertical bars. Thus, all taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>Escherichia coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-04-29.</p>
A. butzleri 
<strong>Fig. 116:3.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
L. borgpetersenii 
<strong>Fig. 101:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
L. interrogans 
<strong>Fig. 115:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
L. kirschneri 
<strong>Fig. 113:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
B. afzelii 
<strong>Fig. 208:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
B. anserina 
<strong>Fig. 99:5.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
B. burgdorferi 
<strong>Fig. 234:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
 
<strong>Fig. 114:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
B. garinii 
<strong>Fig. 233:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
B. theileri 
<strong>Fig. 161:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
B. aalborgi 
<strong>Fig. 131:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
 
<strong>Fig. 97:5.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
B. hyodysenteriae 
<strong>Fig. 232:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
B. innocens 
<strong>Fig. 132:3.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
B. intermedia 
<strong>Fig. 98:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the order <i>Spirochaetales</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Spirochaetes</i> except <i>Streptococcus pyogenes</i> and <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> subsp. <i>aureus</i>, which belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i> and <i>Escherichia coli</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i>. The genera which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>E. coli</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-02-10.</p>
B. pilosicoli 
<p><strong>Fig. 125:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera <i>Rhodococcus</i> and <i>Nocardia</i>. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p><p> </p><p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-05-10.</p>
A. suis 
<strong>Fig. 1:5.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-05-10.</p>
T. pyogenes 
<p><strong>Fig. 257:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera <em>Rhodococcus</em> and <em>Nocardia</em>. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p>

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-05-10.</p>
A. hordeovulneris 
<p><strong>Fig. 118:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella</i> <i>equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera <i>Rhodococcus</i> and <i>Nocardia</i>. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p><p> </p><p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-05-10.</p>
A. bovis 
<p><strong>Fig. 120:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera <em>Rhodococcus</em> and <em>Nocardia</em>. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p>

<p> </p>

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-05-10.</p>
A. viscosus 
<strong>Fig. 126:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-05-10.</p>
D. congolensis 
<p><strong>Fig. 2:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this bacterial page.</p>

<p> </p>

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-05-10.</p>
R. salmoninarum 
<strong>Fig. 223:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-05-10.</p>
M. luteus 
<strong>Fig. 253:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-01-19.</p>
M. caprae 
<strong>Fig. 6:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-01-19.</p>
 
<strong>Fig. 252:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-02-01.</p>
C. equi 
<strong>Fig. 10:9.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-02-01.</p>
R. equi 
<strong>Fig. 123:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-02-01.</p>
N. asteroides 
<strong>Fig. 123:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-02-01.</p>
N. farcinica 
<strong>Fig. 3:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 


<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-01-19.</p>
C. bovis 
<strong>Fig. 256:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-01-19.</p>
C. cystitidis 
<strong>Fig. 170:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 
 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-03-02.</p>
C. diphtheriae 
<strong>Fig. 169:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-03-02.</p>
C. kutscheri 
<strong>Fig. 117:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-03-02.</p>
C. pseudotuberculosis 
<strong>Fig. 105:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p>  

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-03-02.</p>
C. renale 
<strong>Fig. 212:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>. All taxa in the tree belong to this phylum except <i>Bacillus cereus</i> and <i>Clostridium perfringens</i>, which constitute the outgroup and belong to the phylum <i>Firmicutes</i>. <i>Crossiella equi</i> has been placed within the order <i>Pseudonocardiales</i> although it is more closely related to the genera Rhodococcus and Nocardia. The three orders of phylum <i>Actinobacteria</i>, which are represented in VetBact are indicated by vertical bars. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. (T) means type strain. Date: 2017-03-02.</p>
C. ulcerans 
<p><strong>Fig. 68:14.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences ond show the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. Note that the genera <em>Escherichia</em> and <em>Shigella</em> are very closely related.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-01-18.</p>
E. coli 
<p><strong>Fig. 75:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences ond show the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. Note that the genera <em>Escherichia</em> and <em>Shigella</em> are very closely related.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-01-25.</p>
S. sysenteriae 
<p><strong>Fig. 76:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and show the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. Note that the genera <em>Escherichia</em> and <em>Shigella</em> are very closely related.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-01-25.</p>
S. flexneri 
<p><strong>Fig. 69:9.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences ond show the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. Note that the genera <em>Klebsiella</em> and <em>Citrobacter</em> are very closely related.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-02-01.</p>
K. pneum. pneum. 
<p><strong>Fig. 156:6.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences ond show the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. Note that the genera <em>Klebsiella</em> and <em>Citrobacter</em> are very closely related.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-02-01.</p>
K. oxytoca 
<p><strong>Fig. 224:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences ond show the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. Note that the genera <em>Klebsiella</em> and <em>Citrobacter</em> are very closely related.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-02-01.</p>
K. mobilis 
<p><strong>Fig. 142:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences ond show the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. Note that the genera <em>Citrobacter </em> and <em>Klebsiella</em> are very closely related.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-02-01.</p>
C. freundii 
<p><strong>Fig. 70:11.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences ond show the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. Note that the genera <em>Salmonella, Escherichia</em> and <em>Shigella</em> are closely related.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-03-15.</p>
 
<p><strong>Fig. 157:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences ond show the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. Note that the genera <em>Salmonella, Escherichia</em> and <em>Shigella</em> are closely related.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-03-15.</p>
S. enterica ari. 
<p><strong>Fig. 74:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences ond show the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-03-29.</p>
S. marcescens mar. 
<p><strong>Fig. 73:6.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences ond show the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-03-29.</p>
P. vulgaris 
<p><strong>Fig. 72:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences ond show the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. Note that the genera <em>Escherichia</em> and <em>Shigella</em> are very closely related.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-03-29.</p>
 
<p><strong>Fig. 166:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences ond show the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. Note that the genera <em>Escherichia</em> and <em>Shigella</em> are very closely related.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-03-29</p>
M. morgani mor. 
<p><strong>Fig. 173:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences ond show the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-05-03.</p>
E. tarda 
<p><strong>Fig. 172:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-05-03.</p>
E. ictaluri 
<p><strong>Fig. 77:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-05-17.</p>
Y. entero. entero. 
<p><strong>Fig. 78:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-05-17.</p>
Y. pestis 
<p><strong>Fig. 80:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-05-17.</p>
Y. ruckeri 
<p><strong>Fig. 71:5.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-05-17.</p>
P. shigelloides 
<p><strong>Fig. 79:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>which belongs to the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>. <em>Clostridium botulinum</em>, typ C, which belongs to phylum <em>Tenericutes,</em> was used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. The length of the scale bar is equivalent to one nucleotide difference per 100 nucleotide positions. Date: 2018-05-17.</p>
Y. pseudotub. 
<p><strong>Fig. 217:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-06-14.</p>
A. salmonicida 
<p><strong>Fig. 85:6.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain. Date: 2018-09-13.</p>
L. anguillarum 
<p><strong>Fig. 88:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-13.</p>
A. hydrophila achro. 
<p><strong>Fig. 87:5.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-13.</p>
A. salmonicida salm. 
<p><strong>Fig. 86:5.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-13.</p>
A. hydrophila hydro. 
<p><strong>Fig. 82:2.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-13.</p>
 
<p><strong>Fig. 81:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-13.</p>
V. cholerae 
<p><strong>Fig. 83:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-13.</p>
V. parahaemolyticus 
<p><strong>Fig. 84:6.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-13.</p>
V. vulnificus 
<p><strong>Fig. 150:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-13.</p>
C. burnetii 
<p><strong>Fig. 64:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-13.</p>
L. pneumophila 
<p><strong>Fig. 62:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-19.</p>
F. tularensis tular. 
<p><strong>Fig. 63:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-19.</p>
F. tularensis holar. 
<p><strong>Fig. 167:3.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-19.</p>
F. noatunensis noat. 
<p><strong>Fig. 141:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-27.</p>
A. lwoffii 
<p><strong>Fig. 65:7.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-27.</p>
P. aeruginosa 
<p><strong>Fig. 66:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-27.</p>
P. anguilliseptica 
<p><strong>Fig. 104:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-27.</p>
D. nodosus 
<p><strong>Fig. 159:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-27.</p>
S. maltophilia 
<p><strong>Fig. 67:6.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-27.</p>
M. bovis 
<p><strong>Fig. 201:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between some families within the phylum<em> </em> <em>Proteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-09-27.</p>
M. osloensis 
<p><strong>Fig. 154:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-10-18.</p>
P. caballi 
<p><strong>Fig. 177:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-10-18.</p>
A. rossi 
<p><strong>Fig. 58:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-10-18.</p>
 
<p><strong>Fig. 56:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-10-22.</p>
P. multocida mult. 
<p><strong>Fig. 155:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-11-14.</p>
P. dagmatis 
<p><strong>Fig. 176:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-11-14.</p>
G. anatis 
<p><strong>Fig. 59:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-11-14.</p>
H. somni 
<p><strong>Fig. 61:7.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-11-14.</p>
N. semolina 
<p><strong>Fig. 62:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-11-14.</p>
B. trehalosi 
<p><strong>Fig. 60:11.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-11-27.</p>
 
<p><strong>Fig. 199:4.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-11-27.</p>
M. granulomatis 
<p><strong>Fig. 200:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-11-27.</p>
M. varigena 
<p><strong>Fig. 107:5.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-12-06.</p>
A. equuli equ. 
<p><strong>Fig. 106:5.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-12-06.</p>
A. lignieresii 
<p><strong>Fig. 57:5.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-12-06.</p>
A. pleuropneumoniae 
<p><strong>Fig. 149:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-12-06.</p>
A. suis 
<p><strong>Fig. 130:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree, which is based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and shows the natural relations between members of the family <em>Pasteurellaceae</em> within the class<em> </em><em>Gammaproteobacteria</em>. The species on this page is shown in bold and species which are included in Vetbact are shown in blue font.</p>

<p>The tree was genererated by using the  computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">RDP&#39;s web site</a>.  The family <em>Enterobacteriaceae </em>is not represented in this tree and <em>Plesiomonas shigelloides</em>, which belongs to the family <em>Enterobacteriaceae, </em>was therefore used as outgroup. (T) means typ strain.  Date: 2018-12-06.</p>
P. pneumotropica 
<strong>Fig. 46:1.</strong> Phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, which illustrates the relations between members of the classes <i>α-proteobacteria</i> and <i>β-proteobacteria</i>, which are indicated with vertical bars. All taxa in the tree belong to the phylum <i>Proteobacteria</i> except <i>Fusobacterium necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i>, which belongs to the phylum <i>Fusobacteria</i>. Names of taxa in blue are included in VetBact and taxa in bold are included in this  bacterial page.</p> 

<p>The tree was generated on line by using the computer program "Tree Builder" at <a href="http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/" target="_blank">the website of RDP</a>. <i>F. necrophorum</i> subsp. <i>necrophorum</i> was chosen as outgroup. (T) means type strain. Date: 2016-01-14.</p>
N. risticii 

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